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GOODBYE CHRISTOPHER ROBIN gives a rare glimpse into the relationship between beloved children's author A. A. Milne (Domhnall Gleeson) and his son Christopher Robin (Will TIlston), whose toys inspired the magical world of Winnie the Pooh. Along with his mother Daphne (Margot Robbie), and his nanny Olive (Kelly Macdonald), Christopher Robin and his family are swept up in the international success of the books; the enchanting tales bringing hope and comfort to England after the First World War. But with the eyes of the world on Christopher Robin, what will the cost be to the family? As Milne's success grows and he becomes an internationally known author and his books become beloved by children around the world, the lives of Christopher Robin, his mother and his nanny are changed forever. Nostalgic and heart-warming, GOODBYE CHRISTOPHER ROBIN is a must-see film for 2017. (Advance booking highly recommended)

(PG) 107 mins Friday 24th, Saturday 25th November 2017 7:30pm
Director: Simon Curtis
Stars: Margot Robbie, Domhnall Gleeson, Kelly Macdonald

SATURDAY 25TH NOVEMBER
Adult £6.00 Buy at the box office on the night of the performance.
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

From BBC Earth Films, the studio that brought you Earth, comes the sequel – EARTH: ONE AMAZING DAY - an astonishing journey revealing the awesome power of the natural world. Over the course of one single day, we track the sun from the highest mountains to the remotest islands to exotic jungles. Breakthroughs in filmmaking technology bring you up close with a cast of unforgettable characters. Told with humour, intimacy and a jaw-dropping sense of cinematic splendour, EARTH: ONE AMAZING DAY highlights how every day is filled with more wonders than you could possibly imagine- until now.

(U) 95 mins Thursday 30th November 2017 7:30pm
Directors: Richard Dale, Lixin Fan
Stars: Robert Redford, Jackie Chan

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 30TH NOVEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00
Family ticket
(Maximum four seats with at least one attending adult) £12.00


 

Internationally acclaimed crime writer Jo Nesbø’s antihero police investigator, Harry Hole (Michael Fassbender), is back in THE SNOWMAN - a bone-chilling thriller that will take Hole to the brink of insanity. Oslo in November. The first snow of the season has fallen. A boy named Jonas wakes in the night to find his mother gone. Out his window, in the cold moonlight, he sees the snowman that inexplicably appeared in the yard earlier in the day. Around its neck is his mother’s pink scarf. Hole suspects a link between a menacing letter he’s received and the disappearance of Jonas’s mother—and of perhaps a dozen other women, all of whom went missing on the day of a first snowfall. As his investigation deepens, something else emerges: he is becoming a pawn in an increasingly terrifying game whose rules are devised—and constantly revised—by the killer. Fiercely suspenseful, its characters brilliantly realized, its atmosphere permeated with evil, THE SNOWMAN is the electrifying work of one of the best crime writers of our time.

(18) Friday 1st December 2017 7:30pm
Director: Tomas Alfredson
Stars: Rebecca Ferguson, Michael Fassbender, Chloë Sevigny

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 1ST DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The original Blade Runner wasn’t exactly defined by its plot, being more of an experience. The basic story was that Harrison Ford’s blade runner Rick Deckard comes out of retirement to hunt down four rogue replicants – artificial humans with four-year lifespans made for off-world labour, with director Ridley Scott’s hard-baked sci-fi noir really being more about exploring the nature of life and creation. Set thirty years after the events of the first film, BLADE RUNNER 2049 introduces us to a new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), who unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. K’s discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years. Fans of the original film and those new to the Blade Runner experience will not be disappointed with BLADE RUNNER 2049.

(15) 163 mins Saturday 2nd October 2017 7:30pm
Director: Denis Villeneuve
Stars: Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, Ana de Armas

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

SATURDAY 2ND DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The characters in Luca Guadagnino’s quietly staggering CALL ME BY YOUR NAME are members of an incredibly wealthy family. These “Jews of discretion” whose family tree covers most of Western society and who spend summers and holidays at their country home outside a small Northern Italian town live in a separate stratosphere from the everyday ham-and-eggers who make up what we proudly think of as “the real world.” But there are reasons other than financial ones to hold them in high regard. For one thing, with their rustic antique furniture and simple but casually elegant wardrobes, they have exceptionally good taste, something that no amount of money can buy. Most importantly, they are intellectuals and lovers of art and history, traits Guadagnino suggests are responsible for their being understanding, respectful and compassionate people. It’s the summer of 1983 and only son Elio (Timothee Chalamet) is bored. He is, by his own admission, just waiting for the summer to be over when Oliver (Armie Hammer), a young scholar, arrives to assist Elio’s professor father (Michael Stuhlbarg) with paperwork and other studies. Guadagnino takes his time, luxuriating in the warm weather and the languorously accumulating tension but, eventually, Elio and Oliver find themselves in a deep physical and emotional love affair. Chalamet is quickly becoming one of the most reliable young actors around. In CALL ME BY YOUR NAME, he embodies his character. Elio is smart and attractive and aware of those traits without being arrogant about them. Still, he knows he’s no match for Oliver in either the brains or looks and he also knows he is unprepared for the feelings and impulses that crop up after Oliver’s presence. Chalamet spectacularly reveals this burgeoning uncertainty while never forgetting to channel it through the self-assuredness that is Elio’s trademark. Meanwhile, Hammer gives his most robust performance yet and Stuhlbarg presents a sturdy and tactile patriarch who reveals unexpected grace in a late, quietly climactic monologue. The influence of grandmasters such as Renoir, Rivette and Rohmer can all be felt in the film's clear articulation of furious desire, but it's the exchanges between Elio and his father where the film is at its most heart-breaking. Arguably a more poignant relationship than the one between Elio and Oliver, a conversation between the two towards the end of the film will no doubt go down as one of the greatest father-son moments in cinema history. Capturing the agony and ecstasy of young love, CALL ME BY YOUR NAME is a deeply felt movie that's bittersweet, tender and true.

(15) 132 mins Wednesday 6th December 2017 7:30pm
Director: Luca Guadagnino
Stars: Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 6TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

MARSHALL is based on the true story of Thurgood Marshall who became the first African-American Supreme Court Justice. In 1941, a young African-American lawyer named Thurgood Marshall (Chadwick Boseman) partners with a young Jewish lawyer Sam Friedman (Josh Gad). They take on the case of a black chauffeur who has been accused by his wealthy socialite employer of sexual assault and attempted murder. In a career-defining performance of rare power and intensity, Chadwick Boseman delivers a powerful performance as the angry, highly intelligent, and driven young black lawyer who took on the racial prejudice of the 1940’s and broke through every glass ceiling imaginable to become one of the most respected and historically important judges ever to sit on the bench of the American Supreme Court. MARSHALL is a must-see film and highly recommended.

(15) 118 mins Friday 8th, Saturday 9th December 2017 7:30pm
Director: Reginald Hudlin
Stars: Dan Stevens, Sophia Bush, Chadwick Boseman

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 8TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 9TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

LOVING VINCENT is a truly awe-inspiring portrait of the great Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh that boasts the distinction of being “the world’s first fully painted feature film.” That means every one of the nearly 65,000 frames in this near-lunatic labor of love was rendered by hand with oil paints, following a style intended to mimic that of the master — which has precisely the effect you might imagine, pulling audiences into the delirious, hyper-sensual world suggested by van Gogh’s oeuvre. LOVING VINCENT uses van Gogh’s canvases as both form and function, animating them into a saga tracing his last days in Arles, where he made his greatest artistic breakthroughs, to his stay in Auvers-sur-Oise, where he died in 1890 after shooting himself in the torso. Or so goes the story. In this production, the death of van Gogh turns into a murder mystery that revisits his suicide from multiple angles, with a young man named Armand Roulin (Douglas Booth), who was the subject of several portraits by the artist, serving as both detective and narrator. Employing many of the tools of a standard TV thriller, from flashbacks to re-enactments to scenes viewed from van Gogh’s troubled point of view, the script has Roulin fils traveling from Arles to Auvers at the request of his father, postmaster Joseph Roulin (Chris O’Dowd), to deliver a last letter to Theo. But when Armand arrives up north, he finds that Theo is dead as well, having succumbed to the effects of syphilis after being crushed by his brother’s demise. Piqued by curiosity, Armand decides to stay in town to find out what really happened to Vincent. He receives different versions of the story from various subjects of van Gogh paintings, from legendary Impressionist art supplier Pere Tanguy (John Sessions) to Adeline Ravoux (Eleanor Tomlinson), whose family ran the local inn where van Gogh stayed and eventually died, to Marguerite Gachet (Saoirse Ronan) and her father, Dr. Gachet (Jerome Flynn), who treated the artist during his turbulent final months, all the way up to his deathbed. Each character has a diverging opinion of the painter and what may have happened to him, and in that sense LOVING VINCENT does offer up a complex portrait of a man whose more inexplicable acts — the film kicks off with the infamous ear incident in Arles — will never be fully understood. LOVING VINCENT is an artistic homage that admirably tries to resurrect the painter through the glorious work he left behind.

(12A) 93 mins Tuesday 12th December 2017 7:30pm
Directors: Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman
Stars: Saoirse Ronan, Jerome Flynn, Aidan Turner

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

TUESDAY 12TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Although its theology probably isn’t sound, THE BISHOP’S WIFE (1947) nevertheless utilizes its central plotting device wonderfully. Imagine if on a whim an angel came to your rescue, and then imagine that the angel is named Dudley and looks and acts like none other than Cary Grant. In this case, the person in need is a distraught Bishop named Henry Brougham (David Niven). He is right in the middle of a major undertaking to build a new cathedral, and his primary benefactor Mrs. Hamilton (Gladys Cooper) is being a thorn in his side. The building project has consumed all his time and efforts, causing him to neglect his radiant wife Julia (Loretta Young), their little daughter Debbie, and the people from their old parish. Dudley is a character who exists outside of worldly convention. He is constantly kind, always patient, never hurries, and is always helpful to everyone in need be it blind man or bishop. In truth, everyone adores him, because after all he is an angel. Everyone, that is, except Henry who needs him most. Henry unwittingly asked for help and now he has an angel in his midst, but Dudley will not allow that to be revealed to anyone else. It’s an unnecessary detail, and besides he has much more pressing matters like attending to Julia and assisting Henry with his work. To her, he is purely a radically pleasant and good-hearted individual. With such positives there hardly needs to be any explanation, only wonderment. Thanks to Dudley’s interventions, the world is set right, just in time for Christmas. Dudley takes one final approving look and walks off in the snow. His work here is done. Peace on Earth and Goodwill towards men. What this all boils down to is that THE BISHOP’S WIFE is a wonderful, feel good movie which radiates amusement and warmth. Through a lovely storyline, some equally lovely performances and by capturing a bit of Christmas magic it will leave you feeling satisfied, entertained and happy.

(PG) 109 mins Wednesday 13th December 2017 7:30pm
Director: Henry Koster
Stars: Cary Grant, Loretta Young, David Niven

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 13TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

In the uncompromising terrains of the old American West, BRIMSTONE introduces us to mute midwife Liz who enjoys a humble existence with her young daughter, independently minded stepson and loyal, devoted husband. Seemingly content with her life, Liz’s eyes nonetheless betray a quiet sadness, suggesting a previous life fraught with pain and anguish. One day in church, her delicate peace is shattered when she hears the ominous, Dutch-tinged drawl of the town’s new preacher. Instantly recognising the man that she had so desperately hoped to have escaped, Liz must prepare to protect both herself and her family from the reverend’s merciless grasp. Told in four distinct chapters, writer/director Martin Koolhoven’s extraordinary western is a ferociously rendered, richly-evocative tale of bloodshed and retribution driven by Dakota Fanning’s remarkable turn. Imbuing Liz with a quiet fragility and steely determination, Fanning’s tenacious frontierswoman instantly joins the ranks of cinema’s most compelling Western heroines. Memorable support is provided by a stellar cast including Kit Harington and Carice van Houten, while special mention must go to Guy Pearce for his terrifying portrayal of Liz’s unrelenting nemesis. With a visual lyricism in striking contrast to the gruelling violence on screen, BRIMSTONE is a deeply affecting tale of moral reckoning which is often difficult to watch, but impossible to forget.

(18) 149 mins Thursday 14th December 2017 7:30pm
Director: Martin Koolhoven
Stars: Carice van Houten, Kit Harington, Dakota Fanning

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 14TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Based on the true story of British advocate for the disabled Robin Cavendish, BREATHE stars Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy. Cavendish (Garfield) was paralyzed with polio at the age of 28 and given just three months to live. Against all advice, his wife Diane (Foy) brought him home from hospital and inspired him to lead a long and fulfilled life. Cavendish died in 1994 at the age of 64. This inspiring true love story of an adventurous couple who refuse to give up in the face of a devastating disease has the makings of a true Oscar contender. A heart-warming celebration of human possibility, BREATHE also marks the directorial debut of Andy Serkis.

(12A) 117 mins Friday 15th, Saturday 16th December 2017 7:30pm
Director: Andy Serkis
Stars: Diana Rigg, Claire Foy, Andrew Garfield

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 15TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 16TH DECEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Glenn Ford plays a straight-arrow police detective named Bannion in Fritz Lang's THE BIG HEAT (1953) -- unbending, courageous, fearless. He takes on the criminals who control the politics in his town and defeats them. One of his motives is revenge for the murder of his wife, but even before that happens he has an implacable hatred for the gang headed by Mike Lagana (Alexander Scourby) and his right-hand man Vince Stone (Lee Marvin). He is the good cop in a bad town. That at least is the surface reality of the film. But there is another level coiling away underneath, a subversive level in which Lang questions the human cost of Bannion's ethical stand. Two women lose their lives because they trust Bannion, and a third is sent to her death because of information Bannion gives her. That may not have been his conscious intention, but a cop as clever as Bannion should know when to keep his trap shut. THE BIG HEAT advances dutifully with Bannion like a conventional police procedural until about the halfway point, when it takes fire with the performances of Lee Marvin and Gloria Grahame. This is one of the most inspired performances of Grahame’s career. There was something fresh and modern about Grahame; she's always a little ditzy, as if nodding to an unheard melody. She was pretty but not beautiful, sassy but in a tired and knowing way, and she had a way of holding her face and her mouth relatively immobile while she talked, as if she was pretending to be well-behaved. "It wasn't the way I looked at a man," she said, "it was the thought behind it." Lee Marvin made a scary foil for her, with his long, lean face and his ugly-handsome scowl. Marvin's character brings real menace into the picture, coldly and without remorse. The scene with the scalding coffee has become so famous that you forget it happens off-screen. On the surface, THE BIG HEAT is about Bannion's fearless one-man struggle against a mob so entrenched that the police commissioner is a regular at Marvin's poker game. But if that were its real subject, it would be long and flat and dry. Bannion's buried agenda is to set up the women, allow their deaths to confirm his hatred of the Lagana-Stone crew, and then wade in to get revenge. Of course, he doesn't understand this himself, and it is perfectly possible for us to watch the movie and never have it occur to us. That's the beauty of Lang's moral ambidexterity. In THE BIG HEAT, he tells the story of a heroic cop, while using it to mask another story, so much darker, beneath. (This film is being shown in advance of our screening of Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool which recounts Gloria Grahame’s final days in Liverpool).

(15) 87 mins Wednesday 3rd January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Fritz Lang
Stars: Glenn Ford, Gloria Grahame, Jocelyn Brando

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 3RD JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 
 

FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL is an affectionate, moving and wryly humorous memoir of friendship, love and stardom. Gloria Grahame's (Anette Benning) greatest role turned out to be her own death scene as limned by her lover of several years standing, Peter Turner (Jamie Bell), a British actor half her age. Turner first met the eccentric Grahame in 1978, when both were living in the same rooming house outside London. Gloria, returning to the stage as Sadie Thompson in Rain, was known as a ""legendary floozie"" who had played opposite Bogart, Jimmy Stewart, and Glenn Ford; had worked for DeMille, Fritz Lang, and other great directors; and had won an Oscar for The Bad and the Beautiful. Grahame electrified audiences with her steely expressions and heavy-lidded eyes and the heroines she bought to life were often dark and dangerous. Her romance with Turner bloomed across two continents, with Gloria showing him about Hollywood and Manhattan. Then one morning, unbeknownst to Turner, Gloria found out she had stomach cancer and became so cool to him that he left for home in Liverpool. Later, Gloria showed up in Liverpool, asking Turner to care for her. The house he took her into, his family's, was a zany madhouse that grows only zanier as the film goes along. His mother (Julie Walters), brother, and sister-in-law help him attend the dying film star. Gloria can't eat or drink, but refuses all medical help. Crisis towers upon crisis as the family swills a river of tea, the dog howls, the hired nurse knocks off a fifth of gin on her first (and only) night in the house, rages erupt, and two of Gloria's children arrive. FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL is a well-paced gathering of eccentrics that often stirs the heartstrings.

(15) 105 mins Thursday 4th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Paul McGuigan
Stars: Jamie Bell, Annette Bening, Stephen Graham

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 4TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

What starts out as a lavish train ride through Europe quickly unfolds into one of the most stylish, suspenseful and thrilling mysteries ever told. From the novel by best-selling author Agatha Christie, MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS tells the tale of thirteen strangers stranded on a train, where everyone’s a suspect. One man must race against time to solve the puzzle before the murderer strikes again. Featuring an all star cast including Tom Bateman, Kenneth Branagh, Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Josh Gad and Derek Jacobi, MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS will have you on the edge of your seat even though we all know who did it.

(12A) 114 mins Friday 5th, Saturday 6th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Kenneth Branagh
Stars: Daisy Ridley, Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 5TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 6TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The title 78/52 refers to the number of camera set-ups and the number of cuts in Psycho’s shower scene - a 45-second sequence which took director Alfred Hitchcock seven days to shoot. Alexandre O. Philippe brings the murder to a jury of Hitchcock’s heirs filmmakers, editors, composers and critics who take the film apart and voice their admiration. Philippe’s tribute to Hollywood’s most famous stabbing is an archival feast. No surprise, there are no revisionist Hitchcock haters in the mix. Yet reactions range as widely as the participants - we enjoy factoids about the first toilet ever shown in a feature and the painting that Anthony Perkins takes off the wall to peer at Janet Leigh, plus pronouncements on the film’s pivotal status in world history. Psycho initially felt like a step backwards in black and white, full of jump cuts. It was jolting that a female protagonist is killed off, nude, after only a third of the film has gone by. Naturally, the meta-thought of 78/52 offers plenty of feminist insight “the first modern expression of the female body under assault,” we’re told. We hear of Hitchcock’s own attractions to his actresses, and mull the murder of a woman by a character who dresses as his mother. Murder upstages Janet Leigh in Psycho, and women, who had top billing in the 1930’s, “by the time we got to the end of the 1950’s were secondary,” says Peter Bogdanovich, “and the movie says that.” As with any enduring work of art, Psycho sustains contradicting interpretations that it represents a view of moral punishment, or that it presents an absolutely indifferent universe. Hitchcock quipped that it was all a joke. The shower scene also seems to have been parodied as many times as Edvard Munch’s The Scream, nothing if not the mark of a classic. As for the blood in the shower scene, it was chocolate syrup (Hitchcock said red would have been too unbearable), and the showerhead was altered so the camera could look directly at it without being covered with water. At the end of the scene, Janet Leigh did what any actor would do. She took a breath. Murch and others take us through Hitchcock’s solution to that problem, moving from cut to cut with the footage that he had. It’s a rare inside glimpse of how a cosmic moment is stitched together. 78/52 is essential viewing for anyone with an interest in the craft of filmmaking, and Hitchcock fans will love it.

(15) 91 mins Wednesday 10th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Alexandre O. Philippe
Stars: Alan Barnette, Justin Benson, Peter Bogdanovich

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 10TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The blend of Magical Realism, physical comedy, snappy one-liners and socially observant drama in BOY makes it a gorgeous film with a tremendous amount of heart. The film revolves around the sweet natured 11-year-old boy (nicknamed Boy and played by James Rolleston), his over-imaginative younger brother Rocky (Te Aho Eketone-Whitu) and their father Alamein (played by writer/director Taika Waititi), a petty criminal who is looking for a stash of buried money. Alamein is clearly no good but one of the film’s strengths is ensuring that he remains likeable and sympathetic despite his massive character flaws. BOY is consistently funny and energetic so that the sadder, darker and more serious aspects of the story, which are treated with integrity, never ruin the upbeat mood. All the performances are wonderful and frankly films are rarely this genuine and consistently entertaining. BOY is one of that niche group of films that are about children rather than strictly for them. The crucial ingredient for success is to make adults see things from a kid's perspective, and writer/director Taika Waititi wastes no time in thrusting us into the head of Boy as he gives his school class a whistle-stop tour of his life. Thanks to the freedom of imagination and painfulness of the truth, his life as told by him is awash with adventure - a place where he will soon get to see his hero Michael Jackson, because his father will return, not from jail, but from a world of derring-do and noble punch-em-ups, to whisk him away to the city. For the moment, mind you, with his mum dead and dad in the nick, he's living along with his little brother Rocky  "He thinks he's got super powers... he hasn't" - and a string of cousins at his grandma's place. In fact, as we first encounter the 11-year-old with a 120mph imagination, he's in a position of high responsibility, looking after his younger siblings while his Gran is away at a funeral for several days. When Boy's dad returns unexpectedly, it's clear that far from being an all conquering army hero and diver extraordinaire desperate to reconnect with his kids, he is a two-bit crook who has chiefly come home to find the loot he stashed in the local field. The only problem being, he can't remember where. As the week without grandma progresses, it becomes hard to know who is the more grown up - the adults the children encounter, all of whom are highly irresponsible in their own way, or the kids themselves. BOY is an upbeat, often hilarious, but never mawkish, celebration of love, that burns as fiercely and captivatingly as one of Boy's treasured sparklers. Stick around through the credits or you'll miss a treat.

(15) 88 mins Thursday 11th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Taika Waititi
Stars: James Rolleston, Taika Waititi, Moerangi Tihore

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 11TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

For those who prefer flesh-and-blood super heroes to the comic-book variety, BATTLE OF THE SEXES offers a real-life wonder woman saga with the power to educate and inspire, focusing on the drama that went down both on-court and off when Wimbledon triple-winner Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell) challenged lady’s tennis world champion Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) to a boys against-girls exhibition match. The outcome is widely known, but the backstory proves boisterously entertaining  and incredibly well-suited to the current climate, as King was both fighting for her gender and exploring her sexuality in 1973 when the widely publicized face off happened. King fires the first salvo in the eponymous battle of the sexes after reading that the male players will be competing for a cash prize eight times that of the women’s a discovery that inspires her and business partner Gladys Heldman (Sarah Silverman) to burst into an exclusive all-male club and confront the man they deem responsible: retired tennis champ turned USLTA honcho Jack Kramer (Bill Pullman). When Kramer refuses to make things equal, King announces her plans to form a rival league what would become the Women’s Tennis Assn. wooing the sport’s best lady athletes to her cause, even if it means taking a major pay cut up front. King’s coming out  if only to herself and her dreamboat husband (Austin Stowell)  occupies a significant portion of the film, shining a light on more than just the conservativeness of the era, but the near-impossibility gay athletes faced (and still face) in being true to their identities, lest they lose sponsorships and perhaps even their place on the team. Meanwhile, Carell’s character serves as an almost clownish mouthpiece for old-school chauvinist views, as Riggs goes on television to promote the match by spouting that women belong in the kitchen or the bedroom, and insisting that he can beat any female player on the court. It’s game, set and match for BATTLE OF THE SEXES, a massively entertaining account of the momentous 1973 tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs that also deftly deals with the numerous social issues inherent in the carnival-like contest. Emma Stone comes out swinging with a terrific turn as a star player going through significant personal turmoil, while co-directors Valerie Faris and Jonathan Dayton serve up a finely tuned piece that deftly shoots the drama through with grand human comedy. This is a sure-fire winner. Only in tennis do all the greatest battles start with the words “love all.”

(12A) 121 mins Friday 12th, Saturday 13th January 2018 7:30pm
Directors: Jonathan Dayton, Valerie Faris
Stars: Emma Stone, Steve Carell, Andrea Riseborough

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 12TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 13TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The first woman to win a Nobel Prize; and not just one, but two, with the second making her the first person to ever win two Nobels in two different fields. (Linus Pauling is the only other.) The first female professor at the University of Paris. She headed the Radium Institute (now the Curie Institute). She developed the theory of radioactivity and coined the term. She discovered two elements now found on the Periodic Table – polonium and radium. During WWI she developed mobile x-ray units which then shaped the method of medical care in field hospitals by providing x-ray capability, and she became director of the Red Cross Radiology Service. A wife. A mother. A physicist and chemist. She is Marie Curie. Under the direction of Marie Noëlle, in MARIE CURIE: THE COURAGE OF KNOWLEDGE, Polish actress Karolina Gruszka becomes the very essence of Marie Curie, both as a scientist and a woman. Curie’s story is approached through emotion, romance, and her love for her husband Pierre and their children, with strong focus on her feminist battles. We meet the woman behind the scientist which serves as a springboard for the professional aspects of Curie’s life, often commingled and co-dependent upon her emotional attachments. Curie’s femininity, something of which we have rarely heard or seen, takes center stage, giving us insight and understanding into her mind and drive. But it also serves as a wonderful counter-weight to the hard-charging, fiercely independent woman who fights for her rightful place and recognition in the scientific community and beyond. Focusing on the time period between the two Nobel Prizes during her marriage and professional partnership with husband Pierre, and her affair with colleague Paul Langevin following Pierre’s death, Karolina Gruszka deftly navigates choppy emotional seas of triumph and tragedy, love and loss. We feel Curie’s frustration and anger when rebuffed by all for her accomplishments, with many choosing to deny her abilities and credit work to the deceased Pierre. For a cinematic look at Marie Curie, this is the film to see as it delves into the woman behind the science and how “that woman” is what allowed the curiosity for the science to blossom. Talk about an exquisite film! Visually stunning. Fascinating story and solidly engaging construct. (French/German/English/Polish with subtitles)

(15) 100 mins Wednesday 17th January 2017 7:30pm
Director: Marie Noelle
Stars: Karolina Gruszka, Arieh Worthalter, Charles Berling

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 17TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Rupert Jones’ aptly named debut KALEIDOSCOPE is a cleverly constructed psychological thriller that delves inside the broken mind of a lonely gardener with a chequered past. The narrative is splintered into different pieces and shown in a way that raises questions about when events took place, or if they ever even took place at all. Toby Jones, Rupert’s brother, stars as Carl, a mild-mannered fortysomething living a quiet life after a spell in prison for an unspecified crime. He has a small place in a modest housing scheme and mostly keeps himself to himself, with only his neighbour (Cecilia Noble) for occasional company. He’s looking to change that however, by wading into the world of online dating, where he meets Abby (Sinead Matthews), a bubbly blonde who ends up back at his flat. She’s outgoing and chatty and a stark contrast to the more reserved Carl but she seems interested in him nonetheless. Things take a turn for the weird when Carl wakes up to find Abby’s dead body in his bathroom, with no idea how it got there. He starts to get flashbacks to what transpired the night before, but how much of it actually happened? Just as he’s trying to cover up his potential crime, Carl also has to deal with Abby’s boyfriend beating down the door, the police investigating her disappearance and the untimely arrival of his estranged mother (Anne Reid) who is keen to reconnect. The film focuses on Carl’s gradual loss of control over this situation, battling to get a grasp of his own mind as the world appears to be closing in on him. Jones provides no easy answers, instead continually setting up questions and leaving a lot of things open to interpretation. Appearing on screen for almost the entire run time, Toby Jones is excellent in his portrayal of a lonely, isolated man dealing with strained familial relationships and a past he’d rather forget. KALEIDOSCOPE is an assured and stylistically daring debut by the Jones behind the camera, with his brother delivering one of his best performances in front of it.

(15) 99 mins Thursday 18th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Rupert Jones
Stars: Anne Reid, Toby Jones

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 18TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The year is 1959. The setting: an idyllic American suburb dubbed SUBURBICON. Gardner (Matt Damon) and Nancy Lodge (Julianne Moore), along with their young son Nicky (Noah Jupe, remarkable), appear a paragon of middle-class contentment. Gardner is a financial VP at a successful ad firm, while his striking wife Nancy spends her days loitering on the porch, watching her son play in the yard. Though Nancy is confined to a wheelchair, she remains sharp as a tack, and is often joined by her twin sister Margaret (also Julianne Moore). One day, William (Leith M. Burke) and Daisy Myers (Karimah Westbrook) move in next door. They are an African-American family Suburbicon’s first which sets off a powder keg of hatred and prejudice. At a chaotic town hall meeting, one “progressive” village official claims, “We favor integration, but only at such a time that the Negro feels he’s ready for it… We won’t go backwards.” William and Daisy have a son Nicky’s age, Andy (Tony Espinosa), and the two innocent children instantly bond over their mutual love of baseball. The paranoid townsfolk are far less inviting. Suspicious stares and casual racism soon give way to a mob of foaming at the mouth whites camped outside their home. They spew hate at the top of their lungs, bang on instruments, set fire to their vehicle, and, in one eerily zeitgeisty moment, hang a Confederate flag outside their window. But the Myers, a wholesome god-fearing family, aren’t the problem. The real local menace lies next door, as a terrifying home invasion sets off a string of violent events that leaves several six feet under. Naturally, all the blame is pinned on the arrival of the first black family. Clooney’s film boasts top-notch turns all around, including Damon and Moore as a pair in way over their heads, and child actors Noah Jupe and Tony Espinosa, in whose budding friendship lies hope for the future. But the true engine of SUBURBICON is its darkly satirical screenplay. Its twists and turns are aplenty, and with each passing sin, the hypocrisy of white supremacy is further exposed. This is a brutal story that rewards people justly for their crimes.

(15) 104 mins Friday 19th, Saturday 20th January 2017 7:30pm
Director: George Clooney
Stars: Matt Damon, Julianne Moore, Oscar Isaac

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 19TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 20TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The 1943 film HEAVEN CAN WAIT opens with a 70 year-old man named Henry Van Cleve (Don Ameche) stepping into an opulent drawing room and having a conversation with a refined but menacing man known as His Excellency (Laird Cregar). From their conversation, it quickly becomes obvious that Henry has recently died and His Excellency is in charge of Hell. Most people who come to see His Excellency do so because they want to argue that they do not belong in Hell and they usually end up falling through a convenient trap door. However, Henry is there to argue that, after living an enjoyable but dissolute life, he belongs in Hell. Henry tells the story of his life. He tells how he was born into great wealth and influenced by his down to Earth grandfather (Charles Coburn). As a young man, he spent most of his time chasing after showgirls but eventually, he met the beautiful and kind-hearted Martha (Gene Tierney). He immediately fell in love with Martha but, unfortunately for him, she was engaged to his cousin (Allyn Joslyn). Henry, however, used his considerable charm to convince her to elope with him. And, for 25 years, Henry was happy with Martha. It took him a while to settle down and, at one point, Martha even left him as a result of his affairs. However, they always got back together and Henry eventually did settle down, even going so far as to prevent his son from running off with a showgirl of his own. It was only after Martha herself died that Henry, who always felt he didn’t deserve her love, returned to his old ways. And, Henry argues, it’s because he was unworthy of his wife that he deserves to spend an eternity in Hell. Does His Excellency agree? Well, it would certainly be a depressing movie if he did. HEAVEN CAN WAIT is one of those films that you watch because the sets look wonderful, the costumes are to die for, and the performers are all pleasant to watch. It’s pure entertainment, a crowd-pleaser in the best sense of the word.

(U) 110 mins Wednesday 24th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Ernst Lubitsch
Stars: Gene Tierney, Don Ameche, Charles Coburn

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 24TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Side effects may include total paralysis of the soul in Yorgos Lanthimos’s psychological drama/thriller/mystery THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER. Told with clinical filmmaking precision and incredible performances, this is a story that will numb and disturb audiences in brilliant, equal measure. Colin Farrell plays Dr Steven Murphy, a successful surgeon with beautiful hands, whose picture-perfect home life comes under threat after befriending the son (Barry Keoghan) of a patient who lost his life on Steven’s operating table. Initially showing numerous acts of kindness and affection to the awkward boy, Steven becomes increasingly wary of Martin, especially once he starts to make threats towards Steven’s family. Loving, if slightly sterile, wife Anna (Nicole Kidman), daughter Kim, and son Bob all become players in a disturbing game of mysterious retribution and calculated suffering. Farrell and Kidman enjoy a spectacular chemistry that seems as if the main ingredient is morphine, and can appear lifeless in the first third of the movie. However, once the plot of THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER becomes more apparent, the vice-like grip it has had on you will keep you utterly glued to their relationship and how it is affected by this We Need to Talk About Kevin-like menace that has entered their lives. Which brings us on to Barry Keoghan. This is an absolutely career-defining performance from Keoghan. He is completely captivating throughout, turning in a character who is both goofy and monstrous, which is an incredible feat. Few movies can create and sustain this bleakly numbing atmosphere in a way that is totally compelling. The injection of black comedy is consistent and massively effective, and the more disturbing elements are drip-fed with skill and tact. The outcome is a marvellous success.

(15) 121 mins Thursday 25th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Yorgos Lanthimos
Stars: Nicole Kidman, Alicia Silverstone, Colin Farrell

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 25TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

When the bomb explodes at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon in David Gordon Green’s STRONGER, we see it from a distance – in fact, from the perspective not of our protagonist, but from the woman he’s there to cheer on. We meet Jeff Bauman as a person before we know him as a victim. And that approach, that interest in personality over symbolism, is what makes STRONGER so much better than your average based-on-an-inspirational-true-story situation. He is, we’re told, “a chicken roaster from Costco” who’s Boston to his bones. He’s a funny, charming character, played by Jake Gyllenhaal with all the breezy charisma he’s got (which is saying something). That sense of humor takes a turn towards gallows after Jeff loses both legs in the bombing at the marathon. He’s one of those guys who likes to beat everyone to the joke, so no one’s ever ill at ease, but the film peers beyond that okey-dokey veneer. Early on, for example, Gordon gives us a long scene of nurses and doctors changing the dressing on his legs, lingering on this relatively simple procedure, staying on his face all the way through as he experiences a heretofore unknown level of straight-up agony. He’s got Erin (Tatiana Maslany) at his bedside during that scene, and the complexity of their on-again, off-again relationship is perhaps the film’s strongest element. We get a hint of it right away, as she explains to his boss that he was at the finish line for her to prove himself (they were currently on an “off”)  it was the one time he “showed up” for her, and then this happened, so she’s understandably racked with guilt. And what’s driving her becomes a fascinating question: is it real love, or a sense of responsibility (both to him, and for what happened)? Recovery is complicated, and he’s not always good to her, or as open as he needs to be. But the intimacy between them, in the scene where she finally, really touches him, is overwhelming. In the days and weeks following the bombing, Jeff becomes a symbol for the city’s resilience and strength he’s “Boston Strong,” he’s told, so often that he begins to question it: “I’m a hero for standin’ there and gettin’ my legs blown off?” When he enters rehab, a TV reporter asks Jeff, “Are you Boston Strong?”, and he responds with a glassy-eyed-thumbs-up, so as not to disrupt his inspiring recovery narrative. He insists on keeping his pain and uncertainty from everyone his family, his friends, his girl and there’s a scene of him in his bathroom, screaming into a towel after taking a nasty fall, that sums up that feeling of hopelessness and loneliness in a way full pages of dialogue couldn’t. STRONGER is an emotionally potent true-life cinema, a cautiously inspiring film about grotesque physical and mental tragedy and a film that resists easy sentimentality, a film that’s elevated by Jake Gyllenhaal’s flawless performance highly recommended.

(15) 119 mins Friday 26th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: David Gordon Green
Stars: Jake Gyllenhaal, Tatiana Maslany, Miranda Richardson

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 26TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Patricia Clarkson, Cillian Murphy, Timothy Spall and Kristin Scott Thomas get more than their just deserts in British director Sally Potter's dark comedy of manners, THE PARTY. The single setting is a well-appointed London home on an auspicious night for hostess Janet (Scott Thomas), a career politician celebrating her prestige promotion to shadow health minister in the unnamed parliamentary opposition party. Ominously, her academic husband, Bill (Spall), appears to be in shock at the news, numbing himself with booze to a soundtrack of jazz and blues on crackly old-school vinyl. Among the first guests at the party is April (Clarkson), a former idealist turned wisecracking cynic, accompanied by an unlikely partner in the shape of ageing New Age hippie Gottfried (Bruno Ganz). Martha (Cherry Jones) is a veteran feminist college professor whose younger English wife, Jinny (Emily Mortimer), has just learned she is pregnant with triplets. The wild card in the pack, millionaire banker Tom (Murphy), arrives in a highly agitated state with a generous stash of cocaine and a concealed firearm. What could possibly go wrong? Everything can, of course, and dutifully does. Sticking to classic farce rules, almost everybody in THE PARTY is harboring a dark secret which will shatter their cosy complacency by the end of the evening. Following a dramatic confession of terminal illness, extramarital affairs come to light, relationships teeter on the brink of collapse, barbed words are exchanged and punches thrown. And then the gun comes out. Over 71 crisp minutes of fast-paced verbal combat, Potter tests the age-old theory that it’s all fun and games until somebody gets knocked unconscious. In its evergreen themes and stylistic essentials, THE PARTY is the kind of self-skewering middle-class farce that could have graced a West End stage at any point during the last five or six decades. Gleefully nasty, zinger-packed and over in 71 minutes, Sally Potter's dark drawing-room comedy is her zestiest work in ages. (In addition to THE PARTY, we will also be screening a short British comedy classic, DINNER FOR ONE, starring Freddie Frinton and May Warden)

(15) 71 mins Tuesday 30th January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Sally Potter
Stars: Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

TUESDAY 30TH JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS (1951), one of the American Film Institute's Top-100 American Films. Kelly plays an ex-GI who loves Paris and loves even more an alluring (but engaged) perfume-shop clerk (Leslie Caron in her beguiling screen debut). Dance sequences spun around Gershwin songs accent Kelly's romantic pursuit. And the final 17-minute ballet -combining the title symphony, Impressionist set stylings and Kelly's unique talent for telling a story in dance -lifts this winner of six Academy Awards including Best Picture into the ether of timelessness. Love Is Here to Stay Kelly sings. So is AN AMERICAN IN PARIS.

(U) 111 mins Wednesday 31st January 2018 7:30pm
Director: Vincente Minnelli
Stars: Gene Kelly, Leslie Caron, Oscar Levant

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 31ST JANUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Until this past year, no major female superhero existed cinematically on the big screen. When she appeared however, she broke box office records and started a phenomenon. She was Wonder Woman. Riding the wave of that phenomenon is another type of origin story, PROFESSOR MARSTON AND THE WONDER WOMEN. The film follows the story of Dr. William Marston (Luke Evans), a psychology professor in the 1930s at Harvard who, along with his wife Elizabeth (Rebecca Hall), is doing research on a lie detector. The professor is also well known for his teaching of DISC theory, which centres around four different personality traits  dominance, inducement, submission and compliance. When the pair meet a new student, Olive (Bella Heathcote) they both immediately become intrigued by the young woman. She is incredibly beautiful, intelligent, shy, yet immediately striking and is hired as William’s teaching assistant. Elizabeth initially warns the girl to not sleep with her husband, despite giving William permission. However, once the trio spends more time together it becomes incredibly evident that they share an indescribable type of love. Rebelling against the sexual taboos of the era, the three begin an intimate affair, and eventually life together. It is from William’s love and respect for these two women that Wonder Woman is eventually born. Casting here is brilliant, with Hall, Evans and Heathecoate sharing a palpable chemistry. It’s very easy to fall in love with this family and their tender way with one another. The whole cast is incredibly strong. Evans is always likeable as William, Hall brings a certain bravado to Elizabeth  confident and assured. But, it is Heathecote who allows Olive to shine, and she grows with her. Witnessing her transition from a timid young girl to a self-reliant woman is part of the beautiful journey. The origin story of Wonder Woman may not be what you expect, but it is certainly one of the most interesting stories you’ll see. PROFESSOR MARSTON AND THE WONDER WOMEN never forces on you what must have been a terrible burden on the family from the outside world. Though their love ostracizes them from society they find their own way that allows you to question, as they do in the film, “What is normal?” And also why societal ‘normal’ matters. Through their journey, it becomes incredibly clear that Wonder Woman was NOT the only hero in this story.

(15) 108 mins Thursday 1st February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Angela Robinson
Stars: Luke Evans, Rebecca Hall, Bella Heathcote

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 1ST FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN is a bold and original musical that celebrates the birth of show business and the sense of wonder we feel when dreams come to life. Inspired by the imagination of P.T. Barnum, THE GREATEST SHOWMAN tells of a visionary who rose from nothing to create a spectacle that became a worldwide sensation. When P.T. Barnum (Hugh Jackman) loses his office job, he has an idea. He gathers unique and talented people to create a show like nothing that's ever been seen before. He creates the traveling Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, a.k.a. "The Greatest Show on Earth." The mesmerizing spectacle soon takes the world by storm to become the greatest show on Earth. THE GREATEST SHOWMAN will not only tell you how he accomplished this amazing feat, it will also give you the opportunity to see a dazzling recreation of what truly was the greatest show on earth.

(12A) Friday 2nd, Saturday 3rd February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Michael Gracey
Stars: Zendaya, Rebecca Ferguson, Hugh Jackman

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 2ND FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 3RD FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

In FINAL PORTRAIT, director Stanley Tucci calls upon the stupendous, reliable talents of Geoffrey Rush to evoke a chapter in Alberto Giacometti’s life when he put brush to canvass to construct a portrait of journalist James Lord (Armie Hammer) in his Paris studio. By the late 1950s, without fully realising it, he was in the autumn days of his life, and Tucci highlights Giacometti as gruff, eccentric and thoroughly unpredictable. It might be the stuff of cliché, but it piques intrigue all the same. Giacometti develops a peculiar bond with Lord, and these two (un)likely lads go for numerous strolls, drink coffee and down wine whilst Giacometti extolls his view on the world. ‘I want to see the world the way you do’, says Lord. It might make for an interesting vacation, but a permanent place of residence would surely be disorientating. Giacometti comes across as a man enslaved to his whims. He indulges capriciously, albeit with full-hearted commitment, to whichever whim he so evinces. There is enough charm in Hammer and Rush’s chemistry to engage and pull the audience onside. James Lord was no protégé, he was a participant and an observer; a subject and a fleeting muse. It was one that indulged the mercurial, eccentric artist. With the knowledge that such artists as Rembrandt and Mozart died penniless, it is nice to understand that Giacometti had a casual relationship with the financial spoils procured by his talent. Warmly directed and warmly performed, FINAL PORTRAIT is a quaint window into a specific chapter of another time and another place.

(15) 90 mins Thursday 8th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Stanley Tucci
Stars: Armie Hammer, Geoffrey Rush, Tony Shalhoub

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 8TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Jonathan Demme’s game-changing thriller THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS (1991) returns to cinemas in a new remastered edition. In her efforts to catch the psychopathic serial killer Buffalo Bill, rookie FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) adopts a high-risk strategy in visiting the imprisoned, dangerous and highly intelligent psychiatrist Dr Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) for his insight. Triggering a deadly psychological game of cat-and-mouse, where Lecter always seems to have the upper hand, the tension levels ratchet up as their goals become increasingly intertwined. Masterfully directed by Jonathan Demme, who passed away earlier this year, THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS remains one of the great, most popular and influential thrillers of recent decades. A huge box office success, it was showered with awards, including the ‘big five’ Oscars®; Best Picture, Director, Actress, Actor and Adapted Screenplay, a feat still only ever achieved by three films (the other two are It Happened One Night (1934) and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)). It is still the only Best Picture winner that could be deemed a horror movie. THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS blurred the lines between the crime thriller and horror genres like never before. With only a few graphic scenes, the violence was largely psychological and Anthony Hopkins’ Hannibal Lecter instantly became one of the most terrifying villains in cinema history. Surprisingly, he is only on screen for a total of 16 minutes in the entire film and despite the intensity of their disturbing relationship, Jodie Foster recently revealed that she and Hopkins didn’t actually speak to each other on set, as the character petrified her so much. In what is generally thought to be the best performance of her career to date, Jodie Foster brought a new kind of female hero to the screen in her compelling portrayal of the vulnerable but determined agent Clarice Starling. The chance to see this all-time classic thriller – still as vital and horrific as ever – on the big screen, in a new remaster, cannot be missed.

(15) 114 mins Friday 9th February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Jonathan Demme
Stars: Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Lawrence A. Bonney

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 9TH FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The 1950's - FERRARI: RACE TO IMMORTALITY recreates the iconic Scuderia Ferrari battle to stay on top in one of the deadliest decades in motor racing history. Cars and drivers were pushed to their limits, and the competition for the world championship meant racing on a knife edge where one mistake could take a life. At the centre of it all was Enzo Ferrari, a towering figure in motor racing who was driven to win at any cost. Amidst the stiff competition within his Ferrari team, two of its British stars, Peter Collins and Mike Hawthorn, put friendship first and the championship second. FERRARI: RACE TO IMMORTALITY tells the story of the loves and losses, triumphs and tragedy of Ferrari's most celebrated drivers in an era where they lived la dolce vita during the week and it was win or die on any given Sunday.

(15) 91 mins Tuesday 13th February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Daryl Goodrich

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

TUESDAY 13TH FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Based on the New York Times bestseller, WONDER tells the incredibly inspiring and heart-warming story of August “Augie” Pullman. Born with facial differences that, up until now, had prevented him from going to a mainstream school, Auggie (Jacob Tremblay) became the most unlikely of heroes when he entered the local fifth grade. With the help of his mother, Isabel (Julia Roberts) and his father, Nate (Owen Wilson), he tries to fit in at a new school named Beecher Prep and shows everyone that he is just an ordinary kid, no different than the rest of the world. He strives to teach others that beauty is not just on the outside. As his family, his new classmates, and the larger community all struggle to discover their compassion and acceptance, Auggie's extraordinary journey unites them all and proves you can't blend in when you were born to stand out. Outstanding and inspirational on every level, WONDER tells a story with a lesson for all of us.

(PG) 113 mins Thursday 15th February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Stephen Chbosky
Stars: Julia Roberts, Jacob Tremblay, Owen Wilson

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 15TH FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

The period during which Winston Churchill rose to Prime Minister was filled with tension and apprehension as Britain stood at a crossroads at the beginning of World War II, faced with the threat of an advancing Nazi Germany. DARKEST HOUR catalogs the events from May 9th, 1940 to May 28th, 1940. During this time, the British army was trapped in Dunkirk. Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman) had to fight against his party and the King to convince them to do what he believed was right; to take a stand and fight the advancing German army. On May 25th, Winston learns that the men are trapped in Dunkirk and calls FDR to see if he can help, but he is denied. This is when Churchill has no other choice but to order civilian boats to try to rescue the men trapped in Dunkirk. As the rest of Parliament pushes Winston to give in and have peace talks with Hitler, he continues to stand strong. Facing the death of many men, and the surrender of Belgium and potentially France, his faith waivers as he begins to tell Chamberlain and Halifax to begin the process of peace talks. The King visits Winston and renews his faith in fighting the war, and the next day Winston decides to meet the people of Britain and see what they have to say. In an emotional moment, he learns that people would rather fight than give up their homes. This moment inspires Winston to give a spectacular speech that ends the film. DARKEST HOUR is easily one of Gary Oldman’s best performances to date and is sure to get him a Best Actor nomination at the Oscars. Despite a two-hour runtime, the film is captivating as we see Winston Churchill’s determination in inspiring a nation to rise and fight the Fascists threatening to take over their island. The direction, writing, performing and cinematography are top-notch and woven together to form a stunning film, sure to remind us that we cannot stand down against dictators, fascists and those who threaten our way of life.

(PG) 89 mins Friday 16th, Saturday 17th February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Joe Wright
Stars: Lily James, Gary Oldman, Ben Mendelsohn

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 16TH FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 17TH FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

In TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT (1944) Humphrey Bogart plays a fisherman who rents his boat and his services to anyone with money. Lauren Bacall is a weary traveller who falls in love with him. They call each other by nicknames. She's "Slim" and he's "Steve." There is no mush between them. Their one romantic scene consists of witty, sharp dialogue, written by William Faulkner and Jules Furthman (two of the greatest writers the movies ever had). Bacall kisses Bogey. Bogey asks what the verdict is. She replies "I don't know yet," and goes in for another. The scene ends with the famous, "you know how to whistle, don't you Steve?" line. Walter Brennan, in one of his greatest roles, is the rummy Eddie, who thinks he takes care of Bogie, but it's really the other way around. The movie never questions their relationship. Clearly, Eddie is an alcoholic, and a pain in the butt, but Bogey's loyalty to him is unfaltering. We know that when he is asked to help the French resistance, he can't say no, despite his barbed dialogue and tough-guy facade. Director Howard Hawks was, above all, a storyteller. His eye for characters, actors, locations, music, timing, and pace was impeccable. We slip into the story with such ease that we don't even notice we're watching a movie until it's over. TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT is a great adventure movie, a great romance (both on and off screen), a great example of film writing, and a great essay on how to make a movie. That’s four good reasons to check it out.

(PG) 100 mins Tuesday 20th February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Howard Hawks
Stars: Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Walter Brennan

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

TUESDAY 20TH FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

When now-renowned primatologist Jane Goodall went to Tanzania to study chimpanzees, she had no scientific qualifications or formal training. Armed with a passion for nature and her tenacity, she changed the way our closest cousins are understood by science. Brett Morgan's JANE blends hundreds of hours of archival footage with a new interview with Goodall to tell her remarkable story. It's astonishing to think now that before Goodall, the scientific community had no idea that chimps use tools, or that their intelligence is so closely linked to our own. With her lack of scientific expertise, Goodall tells us that her inexpert background freed her to observe the chimps' behaviour without the bias of scientific consensus. Goodall describes the early days of her research while archives are pieced together to construct a narrative of those early months and years. The grainy colour footage is truly beautiful, capturing the diversity of life in the bush as well as the unique personalities of the chimps Goodall gradually bonded with. For those already familiar with Goodall's story, Morgan's film adds little new to the picture, but is instead a tribute to her work and her enduring legacy, describing her scientific discoveries with her personal life as one narrative whole. For Goodall, the two were inextricable - in studying the chimps she formed close personal bonds with them, gaining their trust over many years. For traditional researchers, this merging of the scientific and the personal is a big no-no, but to Jane it made perfect sense. Goodall's conviction is compelling, passionate, and deeply moving. Her work was both revolutionary and profoundly important to the emerging conservation project. JANE makes no claims to objectivity but is instead a deeply felt, loving tribute to a truly remarkable woman.

(PG) 90 mins Wednesday 21st February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Brett Morgen
Star: Jane Goodall

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 21ST FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

A sensationally funny and affecting dark comedy, THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI is anchored by an acid sense of humour and a top-form Frances McDormand. This insightful study of collective guilt and individual forgiveness is also the year’s funniest film. The billboards of the title are erected by McDormand’s Mildred Hayes, whose daughter was brutally murdered a year previous, and with no leads since then, she turns to public advertising to keep the case in the minds of the Ebbing police force. Gifted with cutting monologues and hilarious one-liners, all backed with real fury and tragedy, McDormand is never less than totally commanding in the kind of brilliant but difficult acting that should net her countless awards. Martin McDonagh’s electrifying script brings out the best in the rest of the cast too. Woody Harrelson is fabulous as Chief Willoughby, to whom the billboards are directly and damningly addressed, Sam Rockwell does his best work since Moon as a thuggish deputy, and Manchester by the Sea’s Lucas Hedges again proves his ability to hold his own against towering adult performances. A perfectly downbeat ending provides the exact sort of unhappy non-closure that turns out to be the most logical and satisfying choice. A film that you’d be willing to let go on forever, THREE BILLBOARDS nevertheless quits while it is ahead, leaving all its characters in exactly the right place.

(18) 115 mins Friday 23rd February 2018 7:30pm
Director: Martin McDonagh
Stars: Frances McDormand, Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 23RD FEBRUARY
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

MOLLY’S GAME - a true story drama about a driven young woman who ran one of the most exclusive high-stakes poker games in the world—makes for a successful debut feature from Director Aaron Sorkin, while also boasting some phenomenal performances and, unsurprisingly, a firecracker of a script. This is a film about Molly Bloom (Jessica Chastain), a former Olympic-class skier whose injury forced her to find another career path. Through a mix of luck and ambition, she finds herself running a high-stakes poker game in Los Angeles frequented by celebrity A-listers, where she quickly learns the ropes and uses her tremendous intellect to, essentially, build her own wildly successful business from the ground up. Years later she would find herself the target of an FBI investigation and under federal prosecution with her entire bank account wiped out and potentially years behind bars ahead of her. MOLLY’S GAME chronicles Molly’s story from beginning to end, albeit not exactly in sequential order. The film features a fractured narrative that moves back and forth, framed with a present day-set story in which Molly is talking out her case with a do-good, no-nonsense lawyer named Charlie Jaffey brought to life in a stunning turn by Idris Elba. Chastain and Elba’s rapport in these scenes is positively electric. But the real star is Chastain, and she is dynamite. She imbues the character with obvious strength, but you can see the nagging need to succeed just behind her eyes, like she has something to prove. Chastain is one of our greatest living actresses, and she plays the hell out of a character that goes from naïve but driven assistant to assured (yet overstretched) CEO over the course of two and a half hours. Through it all, Chastain shows us what a “strong female character” looks like—a human being containing a multitude of emotions, not simply a female character who’s masculine or “tough.” MOLLY’S GAME offers a compelling chronicle of a complex story spearheaded by a terrific actress doing phenomenal work. And it’s an absolute blast to boot.

(15) 140 mins Thursday 1st March 2018 7:30PM
Director: Aaron Sorkin
Stars: Jessica Chastain, Idris Elba, Kevin Costner

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THURSDAY 1ST MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Opening in 1928, JOURNEY’S END depicts the tragic futility of the Great War through the metaphor of lost youth and serves as a timely reminder of the true cost of that terrible conflict. Asserting his status as a serious young talent, Asa Butterfield ably leads the film as fresh-faced Lieutenant Raleigh, fresh from basic training and blissfully ignorant of the horrors that await him in the trenches. Full of enthusiasm for the adventure of the front, this role could so easily come off as irritating or mawkish, but screenwriter Simon Reade preserves the character's doomed tragedy, brought to callow life by Butterfield. Rounding out the cast with unshowy performances are Sam Claflin as Captain Stanhope, cracking under the strain of the front, Stephen Graham as the unfazed Trotter, Toby Jones as sarcastic mess officer Mason and Tom Sturridge as a shadow-eyed Hibbert suffering from shell shock. But it's Paul Bettany's second-in-command Osborne who does the emotional heavy lifting, keeping his Company together and mentoring Raleigh, all the while knowing that sooner or later, they are all doomed. JOURNEY’S END offers a sombre psychological depiction of innocence lost.

(15) 107 mins Friday 2nd , Saturday 3rd March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Saul Dibb
Stars: Sam Claflin, Paul Bettany, Asa Butterfield

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 2ND MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 3RD MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

When Frank Capra came upon the 1933 Samuel Hopkins Adams story “Night Bus,” he thought it would make a great film. The problem? Nobody wanted to make the film. Several top actors and actresses of the day turned down the picture, Robert Montgomery, Carole Lombard, and Myrna Loy among them. Clark Gable, not yet the caliber of star he would become, eventually accepted the male lead, and Claudette Colbert eventually (and reluctantly) took the female lead … under the condition that her $25,000 salary would be doubled, which it was. The film’s entire budget was $325,000. Shooting lasted a mere four weeks. When all was said and done though, the film, retitled IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT (1934), came away with five Academy Awards, becoming the first film (and one of only three films still) to receive Oscars in the “big five” categories: best picture, director, actor, actress, and screenplay. It’s funny how things work out. This is what romantic comedies are all about  things improbably and hilariously working out for the best. That’s certainly the case with IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT. When runaway heiress Ellie Andrews (Colbert) jumps ship and flees her father (Walter Connolly), neither she nor he expects what transpires. Against his wishes, she plans to marry the curiously named and rather irrelevant “King” Westley (Jameson Thomas). To do so, she must get to New York City without anyone finding out who she is, lest they alert her father to her whereabouts. At the same time, a drunk, down on his luck reporter, Peter Warne (Gable), has been newly fired (or has assertively quit, as he pretends to fellow drunkards). Both Ellie and Peter are stubbornly independent. She has apparently been a handful for some time (“Daughter escaped again,” wires her father), and she certainly bares her fair share of firecracker determination. Similarly, Peter is more than content to go his own way, talking tough and being charmingly reluctant to give an inch. Neither is in a state of repose when they meet. She’s agitated and he’s inebriated. To say the least, they get off on the wrong foot - which of course means they’re destined to fall in love. If IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT endures, and is continually regarded as the Hollywood classic that it is, it’s due to the romance and the comedy, both dependent on the screen chemistry of Colbert and Gable and on Ruskin’s fantastic screenplay.

(U) 102 mins Wednesday 7th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Frank Capra
Stars: Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert, Walter Connolly

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 7TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Dubbed as one of the greatest writers in history, Guy de Maupassant is well known for his naturalistic style and skill at depicting the harsh realities of ordinary life. This is none the clearer than in his first full-length novel Une vie, which is captured beautifully by director Stéphane Brizé in the film adaptation, A WOMAN’S LIFE. This period film is set in 19th century Paris and follows the ups and downs of young Jeanne du Perthuis des Vauds (Judith Chemla). We first see Jeanne as a cheerful young noblewoman enjoying her parents’ company on their farm, but things quickly take a turn when she meets handsome Viscount Julien de Lamare (Swann Arlaud). She falls in love, they get married, and so begins her mostly miserable life. Her domineering husband turns out to be a serial cheater, who she struggles to deal with under the pressure of her religious instruction. After that chapter of her life takes a tragic turn, her son, who she dotes on, grows up to be a manipulative gold digger who plays on her devotion to him. The heartbreak and pain Jeanne feels throughout her generally sad existence is punctuated with flashbacks to happier times. After she receives another letter from her son with another outlandish demand for money, for example, the scene quickly cuts to a soft tone close-up of him as a young child, with Jeanne’s hand lightly stroking his innocent face. This constant use of contrasting snippets, back and forth, differs from the linear storyline of Maupassant’s original telling, but works well on the big screen as the sharp juxtaposition in mood and colour makes the audience feel the depth of Jeanne’s current despair even more, especially since many of the flashbacks seem to indicate that Jeanne herself is conjuring those memories. The film boasts great performances by the entire cast, but Chemla is especially strong as the lead. She deftly captures both the light and dark of her character’s journey with ease, shifting from a giggling girl in love to a depressed and weakened lady, cold and isolated. Replete with stunning and authentic costume design and settings, A WOMAN’S LIFE is told in telling snapshots of Jeanne’s life and is an utterly moving and engaging adaptation of a French classic which skilfully portrays the troubles and struggles of an ordinary life. Maupassant would be proud. (French with subtitles)

(15) 119 mins Thursday 8th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Stéphane Brizé
Stars: Judith Chemla, Jean-Pierre Darroussin, Yolande Moreau

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THURSDAY 8TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Owen Wilson and Ed Helms head the cast in the hilarious road trip comedy FATHER FIGURES. When the fraternal twin brothers Kyle (Wilson) and Peter (Helms) arrive at their mother Helen's (Glenn Close) wedding, they discover that she made up the story about their father dying from colon cancer when they were infants. In reality, she isn't even sure who he is. They set out on a road trip to find him and go through a list of potential fathers, including former football quarterback Terry Bradshaw, and a man named Roland Hunt (J.K. Simmons), who insists there's no way they're his sons. But as they continue their crazy road trip, Helen tries to convince the boys to stop their search, as she believes their father's identity is irrelevant. FATHER FIGURES is not going to be nominated for any Academy Awards but it is a very, very funny movie.

(15) Friday 9th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Lawrence Sher
Stars: Christopher Walken, J.K. Simmons, Owen Wilson

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FRIDAY 9TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Fans of Edward Albee’s shattering play “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” are going to eat up THE DINNER, a film which joins the many previous films about family dysfunction but writer-director Oren Moverman handles the thematic content with genuine sophistication. The film involves the moral battle of two families whose sons have committed an atrocious crime, one father suggesting that he may hold a press conference to turn in the two criminals, his reasoning opposed by his brother, his wife and his brother’s wife who believe that idealism has its place, but not when your own families are involved. This superbly acted ensemble brings together Richard Gere in the role of Stan Lohman, a congressman well on his way to becoming the governor of his state; Steve Coogan as his younger brother and former high school history teacher Paul; Laura Linney as Paul’s wife Claire Lohman; and Rebecca Hall as Katelyn Lohman, Stan’s trophy wife. Paul has been treated by his wife as a man who needs too much support in order to function, and by his older brother as the emotionally disturbed person that he is. We find out through the incisive dialogue that mental illness runs in the Lohman family, bypassing Stan, the plague resting on Paul’s shoulders. When Stan invites Paul and Claire to a dinner at the poshest restaurant you can imagine one in which the mäitre d’ Dylan Heinz (Michael Chernus) serves not only as sommelier but as a man who lectures the foursome about the origin of each dish, we know right off that we are in the hands of a writer-director who can deal equally with satire and with melodrama. After some semblance of civilized discussion, they change tables to a private room where Stan has something to say that could alter six or seven lives irrevocably. Although both sons have committed a terrible, brutal crime, so far nobody knows the identity of the perpetrators. Paul is willing to use the nuclear option: destroy his own political career, lose his wife to divorce, create a final break with his brother and sister-in-law, and condemn the young lads to a long term in prison. This is the nature of idealism. The other three disagree with this decision and let him know as forcibly as they can without actually raising weapons. THE DINNER brings out all the complexities of this nearly-perfect dramatic situation with cinematic flair and stunning performances.

(15) 120 mins Wednesday 14th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Oren Moverman
Stars: Michael Chernus, Taylor Rae Almonte, Steve Coogan

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 14TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


Inspired by true events, THE POST tells the story of a cover-up that spanned four U.S. Presidents and which pushed the country's first female newspaper publisher and a hard-driving editor to join an unprecedented battle between journalist and government. Steven Spielberg directs Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep in this film about the Pentagon Papers controversy. The story follows the 1971 scandal after the decision of The Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee (Hanks) and publisher Katharine Graham (Streep) to publish The Pentagon Papers. Written and leaked by military analyst Daniel Ellsberg, the Pentagon Papers established that the Johnson Administration had lied to the public and congress about US military involvement in the Vietnam War, and revealed that the Nixon administration had secretly escalated the war. The Nixon administration tried to stop The Post from publishing them, and Assistant U.S. Attorney General William Rehnquist took the case to the Supreme Court, which ruled in favor of the paper. Featuring two of the greatest actors working today, THE POST is a riveting political thriller.

(15) Thursday 15th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Steven Spielberg
Stars: Alison Brie, Tom Hanks, Sarah Paulson

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 15TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

Matt Damon and Kirsten Wiig star in the hilarious comedy DOWNSIZING. Following a discovery in a Norwegian laboratory, a new drug is released which allows for the irreversible shrinking of people to a matter of centimetres. The immediate idea that the scientists have is that this will go a long way towards solving environmental problems. Smaller people produce less waste, consume less resources and simply take up less space. Their utopian dream is for the whole human race to be shrunk, and thus save the planet. Middle-aged, middle-class and middle-American couple Paul and Audrey Safranek (Damon, Wiig) slowly grow to like the idea following a school reunion which features an apparently happy shrunken former classmate (Jason Sudeikis). It's a dryly executed point that almost any idea will become attractive when we see someone from school doing it. The Safraneks have their money worries and career dissatisfactions, but the inciting incident is motivated by keeping up with the Sudeikises. They plan to move to Leisureland where their money - once they've liquidated their assets and paid for the treatment - will be converted proportionally to their size making them instant multimillionaires. The physical process is at once strangely horrifying and funny as heads, eyebrows and bodies are shaved, fillings removed and orifices irrigated. Unfortunately, not everything goes to plan and the Disneyland daydream of never working again isn't quite going to work out for Paul. The solution to the world's woes environmental and economic - and indeed those of Paul can't be solved by retreating to a protected enclave playing tennis, living in dollhouse mansions and driving around in dinky little cars. Damon is perfectly cast as an average Joe, worried about shrivelled ambitions and about whether or not he's getting fat. On waking up newly shrunken, his quick peek at his privates is comically perfect and human. He's a nice guy as he's told by his neighbour - but "a bit pathetic". With co-screenwriter Jim Taylor, Payne renders his nutty idea perfectly believable. Paul's political and personal education comes via a noisy Serbian playboy neighbour, played with scenery-chomping elan by a wonderful Christoph Waltz. Or, more accurately, via his cleaner Gong Jiang (Chau), a one-legged Vietnamese dissident who was shrunk by her government after she was arrested for protesting. She gives a vibrantly broad performance which - among the film's many surprises - becomes increasingly nuanced as the story proceeds. Although ten years in development, DOWNSIZING lands perfectly as a timely antidote to Trump's America. Ultimately, this is a film where helping other people and being empathetic are the true road to salvation and happiness rather than winning "bigly".

(15) 135 mins Friday 16th, Saturday 17th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Alexander Payne
Stars: Matt Damon, Christoph Waltz, Hong Chau

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 16TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 17TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

THE SHAPE OF WATER is unmistakably a Guillermo del Toro film – a fantasy masterpiece that blends all of his fondest obsessions into one sumptuous whole. At heart, it’s a grown-up fairy tale about a beauty and a beast – although the glistening beast is attractive, too, if you have an eye for marine wildlife. The beauty is Elisa (Sally Hawkins), a single woman who lives in a rundown Baltimore apartment in the early 1960s. Having damaged her vocal cords when she was an orphaned baby, she speaks only in sign language and raised eyebrows, but her two best friends are garrulous enough to compensate. One of these is her next door neighbour Giles (Richard Jenkins) - a sweetly neurotic commercial artist whose sunny advertising posters have fallen out of fashion. The other is her loyal colleague, Zelda (Octavia Spencer), who doesn’t stop grousing about her useless husband, “my Brewster”, even while she is dusting million-dollar doomsday devices. Elisa and Zelda, you see, are cleaners in a secret military research facility with the towering machinery and concrete corridors favoured by Bond villains everywhere. One of its laboratories houses a new arrival, a scaly, stripy, finny humanoid known only as the Asset (Doug Jones). He was brought to the facility from a South American rainforest because government scientists (including a mysterious, gentlemanly boffin played by Michael Stuhlbarg) believe that his ability to breathe both air and water could help the Americans take the lead in the space race. If that weren’t undignified enough, the Asset is watched over by Strickland, a beady-eyed security goon who is played by Michael Shannon. A Bible-bashing sadist with an electric cattle prod, Strickland keeps his prisoner manacled in a murky pool or shut in a giant test tube. Elisa is appalled, but her pity for the captive develops into something warmer. She teaches him sign language, introduces him to Benny Goodman records, and generally lets him know how she feels: never has a hard-boiled egg been eaten so flirtatiously. But she soon realises that her boyfriend won’t survive unless she breaks him out. In this fairy tale, Elisa and the Asset take it in turns to be knight in shining armour and damsel in distress. Tempting as it may be to smirk at a passionate affair between a woman and a fish-man, del Toro tells his story with such gushing enthusiasm that he sweeps you along with it. An Oscar contender in pretty much every category, THE SHAPE OF WATER is one of the most delightful films of the year. And it is definitely the best film ever to be a romantic comedy, a melodrama, a spy thriller, a heist caper, a superhero blockbuster and a monster movie all at once. What more do you want?

(15) 123 mins Friday 23rd, Saturday 24th March 2018 7:30pm
Director: Guillermo del Toro
Stars: Sally Hawkins, Octavia Spencer, Michael Shannon

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 23RD MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 24TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

"The happiest musical ever made…" is how MGM's publicity machine described EASTER PARADE upon its initial release in 1948, and despite the passage of more than 65 years, the tagline still rings true today. As light and airy as a scrumptious soufflé, this joyous Irving Berlin confection features a whopping 17 of the composer's best loved tunes, and showcases the incomparable talents of Judy Garland and Fred Astaire in their only screen appearance together. Add a sizzling tap routine by Ann Miller, the charm of Peter Lawford, and an inspired comic turn by Jules Munshin, and it's easy to see why EASTER PARADE remains a perennial holiday favourite, and one of America's most treasured musicals. EASTER PARADE seamlessly juggles its cavalcade of musical numbers and the plot's substantial romantic complications. Those complications begin almost at once, as snappy vaudeville dancer Don Hewes (Astaire) is unceremoniously dumped—both professionally and personally—by his ungrateful partner, Nadine Hale (Miller), so she can star solo in a Ziegfeld Follies revue. In a fit of pique, a lovelorn Don randomly selects the unassuming, insecure, yet beguiling Hannah Brown (Garland) from a saloon chorus line to groom as Nadine's replacement, and vows within a year to make her the sensation of both the 1912 Broadway season and New York's famed Easter Parade. But instead of highlighting Hannah's down-to-earth personality and potent pipes, Don insists she mimic Nadine's more refined, sophisticated image. Following a string of disastrous performances (and a comical tête-á-tête with Nadine), Don realizes his mistake, revamps the act, and begins to recognize Hannah's talent, beauty, and spirit. Most musicals feature a love triangle of some sort, but EASTER PARADE goes a step further by creating a love square. Hannah silently pines for Don, who still carries a torch for Nadine, who aggressively pursues Don's best friend Johnny (Lawford), who instantly falls for Hannah when they meet by chance during a downpour (and sing the sweet but silly ballad, A Fella with an Umbrella). Amazingly, all the tangled relationships iron themselves out in the end, as the film deftly blends the vagaries of human emotion with the ebullience of musical comedy. One of the most enjoyable musicals ever made, EASTER PARADE is a full-bodied experience, integrating songs, comedy, romance, and heartache with such panache it's no wonder it was MGM's top-grossing movie of the year and a crowning achievement for the Arthur Freed Unit. The energy, style, and expertise Garland and Astaire bring to this enduring musical classic prove beyond a doubt that they were a couple of swells, indeed.

(U) 99 mins Wednesday 28th March 7:30pm
Director: Charles Walters
Stars: Judy Garland, Fred Astaire, Peter Lawford

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 28TH MARCH
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

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