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 THE OLIVE TREE  

In THE OLIVE TREE, we meet Alma, a young girl with emotional problems and a special relationship with her grandfather Ramón, an old country man who stopped talking about 12 years ago after his son, Alma's father, sold a 2000-years-old olive tree in order to open a restaurant. Dominated by the sadness and the melancholia caused by the loss of his most beloved tree, Ramon spends his days visiting the place where the olive tree was planted, hoping for the day the tree returns. Unable to bear the situation any longer, Alma begins looking for the olive tree, discovering that it was acquired by a Germany energy company, located in Dusseldorf. Without money or resources, Alma convinces her uncle Alcachofa and her friend Rafa (who has a love interest for her) to go in a truck from Spain to Germany to recover the tree, starting a journey with unexpected consequences for everyone. THE OLIVE TREE speaks about believing again, about learning to trust again, about hope. Using humour and infinite nuances, THE OLIVE TREE manages, with just a handful of characters, to speak about our recent past, about our present time, and about any and all of us. (Spanish/German/French/English with subtitles)

(15) 99 mins Thursday 29th june 2017 7:30pm
Director: Icíar Bollaín
Stars: Anna Castillo, Javier Gutiérrez, Pep Ambròs

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 29th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


   

THEIR FINEST is a nostalgic, jolly hockey sticks moving picture. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. "Authenticity informed by optimism" is the name of the game for British propaganda productions concerned with the morale of a blitzed public in the early years of World War Two and Danish director Lone Scherfig's film about filmmaking opts for a similar spirit of stiff upper-lipped positivity. It's full of the keep calm and carry-on attitude which characterised the era, where people firmly believe that a cup of tea can solve all. "Film is real life with the boring bits cut out," says Sam Claifin's wearying scriptwriter Tom Buckley with tongue firmly in cheek shortly after a young Welsh lady, Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton, perfect in her role) joins their midst. Engaged primarily to write the "slop" - a somewhat degrading term for female dialogue - Catrin soon shows she has far more to offer. She, together with a terrific supporting turn by Rachael Stirling, is a resolute cat among stuffy pigeons who baulk at the notion of women with ideas above their station. "I know only my art," says Bill Nighy's scene-stealing ageing thespian Ambrose Hilliard. Never has the utterance of "semolina pudding" ever dripped with so much vigorous yearning and a cocked eyebrow here and there along with his wonderfully dry self-assurance make this one of the British actor's finest, most uproarious turns in years. Richard E. Grant, with a cameo as Whitehall man Roger Swain, says more with a sideways glance and slight rolling of the eyes than most could with pages of dialogue; Jeremy Irons is his gruff, commanding self as another higher up the food chain; Eddie Marsan is amusing in a buffoonish way as Hilliard's agent. The relationship that develops between Catrin and Tom, in spite of her marriage to a struggling artist (Jack Huston), is handled with restrained warmth which avoids any over-sentimentality, the two actors playing the caustic, frustrated friction of circumstance well. All onscreen are very concerned with making a worthwhile picture, a project to make a difference to the war effort and people in dire need of hope. THEIR FINEST by no means reinvents the wheel but in the hands of Scherfig - who previously directed An Education - it looks wonderful, has enough substance to back up its gleaming charm and is a very enjoyable period piece that wears its heart and intentions firmly on its well starched sleeve.

(15) 117 mins Friday 30th June, Saturday 1st July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Lone Scherfig
Stars: Gemma Arterton, Sam Claflin, Bill Nighy

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 30th June
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 1st July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


FRANTZ  

FRANTZ, the new work from French master François Ozon, showcases the director at his atmospheric best. This historical tale has the trappings of a ghost story as grieving widow Anna (Paula Beer in a heart-breaking performance) recovers from the loss of her husband Frantz during the Great War. But when Adrien (Pierre Niney), a teary-eyed Frenchman, arrives to pay his respects at the grave of Anna’s deceased German husband, the stranger reopens wounds between the two nations that are only beginning to heal in the aftermath of war. Ozon draws Anna and Adrien together as the French soldier becomes a surrogate for Frantz to the widow and her in-laws. The film resonates with the implied spirit of Frantz as Anna and Adrien revisit some of her late husband’s favourite memories and create moments of happiness to escape their sombre post-war disenchantment. Ozon stirringly evokes the return to happier times by manipulating the colour saturation of the film’s palette as heart-warming pastoral scenes mark a return to gaiety and innocence. Hope remains even in the shell-shocked ruins of Europe. The cinematography by Pascal Marti is truly exquisite as the crisp black and white images are sharply reserved and formal as the characters resemble mourners frozen in time, locked into a monochrome snapshot of grief. When the film blooms into palettes of colour, though, FRANTZ warms the heart as it finds hope for tomorrow. It unfurls a peculiar love story between Anna and Adrien in which the unsaid relationship between Adrien and Frantz becomes an underlying mystery. Was Adrien Frantz’s assassin? Were they lovers? Were they allies? There’s a palpable air of forbidden love as the memory of Frantz seduces Anna to her enemy. The complex political backdrop resonates with contemporary tensions of nations united and divide by old grievances and the film aligns itself within a clear tradition of poetic wartime romances when Ozon stages the most tense and riveting rendition of 'La Marseillaise' since the French soldiers belted it out in Rick's Café Americain. Like a post-war Casablanca with echoes of Michael Haneke’s allegorical The White Ribbon, FRANTZ offers a beguiling mystery about the hearts broken and healed by war. (French/German with subtitles)

(12A) 114 mins Thursday 6th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: François Ozon
Stars: Pierre Niney, Paula Beer, Ernst Stötzner

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 6th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE tells the real-life story of one working wife and mother who became a hero to hundreds during World War II. In 1939 Poland, Antonina Zabinska (portrayed by two-time Academy Award nominee Jessica Chastain) and her husband, Dr. Jan Zabinski (Johan Heldenbergh), have the Warsaw Zoo flourishing under his stewardship and her care. When their country is invaded by the Nazis, Jan and Antonina are stunned – and forced to report to the Reich’s newly appointed chief zoologist, Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl). To fight back on their own terms, Antonina and Jan covertly begin working with the Resistance – and put into action plans to save lives out of what has become the Warsaw Ghetto, with Antonina putting herself and even her children at great risk. THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE is a tale of great heroism during very dark and perilous times.

(PG) 124 mins Friday 7th, Saturday 8th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Niki Caro
Stars: Jessica Chastain, Johan Heldenbergh, Daniel Brühl

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 7th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 8th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


THE HANDMAIDEN  

Set in 1930s Korea, during the Japanese occupation, Park Chan-wook’s sumptuous new film, THE HANDMAIDEN, is a twisting thriller adapted from Welsh writer Sarah Water’s much loved book, Fingersmith. Chan-wook’s film is divided into three parts and begins by telling us the story from the point of view of Sookee (Kim Tae-ri), a Korean pickpocket who is enlisted by a ‘Count’ (Ha Jung-woo) to help him seduce a rich girl, Hideko (Kim Min-hee), who is held prisoner inside a giant mansion by a sadistic book collector. Sookee is hired as Hideko’s maid, but instead of committing fully to the Count’s plan for him to seduce Hideki and steal her money, Sookee instead begins to fall in love with Hideko, leading to a number of erotically charged sequences that culminate in a number of highly stylised and exquisitely filmed sex scenes. The tension between the two women is electric, with a simple moment in which Sookee files down a tooth in Hideko’s mouth, being played in such a manner by Chan-wook and the two actresses, that you can’t help but hold your breath throughout. It’s like watching a fuse slowly burning down, with an explosion about to occur at any moment. Whilst there is no shortage of languid shots of the women in various states of undress, shots follow a logic that is all about getting us into the mindset of the two protagonists. In the second part the action switches to Hideko’s point of view and understanding her feelings. Park Chan-wook also makes it pretty clear that men are generally pretty awful – it is the women that hold the real power and need to break free from the patriarchal manacles thrust upon them – and also weak and easily manipulated by sex. There are a number of sequences in which we see men being read erotic fiction, and the reactions are entirely played for laughs, as they are revealed to be weak and rather ridiculous. Whilst not filled with laughs – this is at heart an erotically charged and thrilling potboiler – THE HANDMAIDEN is a great deal of fun and Park Chan-wook does a such a good job with the film’s many twists and turns that many of them will leave you with a broad grin on your face. THE HANDMAIDEN is like a corkscrew: the plot slowly twisting and turning, but gradually focusing in on one point. It’s brilliantly done and an absolute joy to watch. (Korean/Japanese with subtitles)

(18) 156 mins Thursday 13th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Chan-wook Park
Stars: Min-hee Kim, Jung-woo Ha, Jin-woong Jo

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Thursday 13th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


MISS SLOANE  

In a time of fiery debate, just following a tumultuous election year, nothing is as timely or educational as John Madden‘s politically charged MISS SLOANE. The film tells the story of a brilliant and ruthless lobbyist, Elizabeth Sloane. She is notorious for her unparalleled talent and her desire to win at all costs. When she goes rogue to push a gun control measure in America, her career and morals are put at risk. Firmly entrenched as Elizabeth Sloane, Jessica Chastain manages one of her finest performances yet. Nimble in movements but nearly paralyzing in line delivery, the Oscar-nominated actress is unparalleled in her sheer excellence and commitment to the craft. The twist and turns of the tale allow her to precisely land each punch to the stomach with advancing intensity. It’s a complete and marvelously unstoppable force that is worthy of Academy Awards consideration. MISS SLOANE is an intelligent and informed look into the corruption of politics. It shows the vigorous nature in which politicians yearn to keep their positions and how our leaders are often picked and sabotaged. It crackles with excitement and performances. It unmasks the raw, honest truth of the system. It is the simmering gem of the year.

(15) 132 mins Friday 14th, Saturday 15th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: John Madden
Stars: Jessica Chastain, Mark Strong, Gugu Mbatha-Raw

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 14th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

Saturday 15th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


BREAKING AWAY  

BREAKING AWAY (1979) is a thoroughly delightful comedy, lifted by fine performances from Dennis Christopher and Paul Dooley. The story is a triumph for the underdog through sports genre, this time cycle racing. Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern and Jackie Earle Haley are four recent high-school graduates with no particular educational ambitions, yet stuck in a small college town – and a fairly snooty college town at that. But Christopher’s character is a heck of a bike rider and such an adulator of Italian champions that he pretends to be Italian himself, even at home. Pretending to be an Italian exchange student, he meets pretty coed Robyn Douglass and this ultimately brings the local boys into conflict with the more privileged college students which must finally be resolved in a big bike race. The relationship among the four youths is warm and funny, yet full of different kinds of conflicts. Quaid is very good as the ex-quarterback facing a life with no more cheers; Haley is good as a sawed-off romantic; and Stern is superb as a gangly, wise-cracking mediator. The events of one summer teach our young hero important lessons about love and life in a heart-warming and exciting tale. The coming of age story has been told many times before but never with more warmth and humour than in BREAKING AWAY.

(12) 97 mins Wednesday 19th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Peter Yates
Stars: Dennis Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wednesday 19th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD  

Acclaimed filmmaker Guy Ritchie brings his dynamic style to the epic fantasy action adventure KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD. Starring Charlie Hunnam in the title role, the film is an iconoclastic take on the classic Excalibur myth, tracing Arthur’s journey from the streets to the throne. When the child Arthur’s father is murdered, Vortigern (Jude Law), Arthur’s uncle, seizes the crown. Robbed of his birth-right and with no idea as to who he truly is, Arthur comes up the hard way in the back alleys of the city. But once he pulls the sword from the stone, his life is turned upside down and he is forced to acknowledge his true legacy…whether he likes it or not. You can be sure that KING ARTHUR will be packed with high-octane action, epic deeds, and a great sense of fun.

(12A) 126 mins Friday 21st July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Guy Ritchie
Stars: Charlie Hunnam, Annabelle Wallis, Daniel Stisen 

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 21st July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE  

Director Aki Kaurismaki’s THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE tells two very different stories which eventually converge around half way through this extremely funny comedy/ drama.  The first involves a Syrian refugee named Khaled (Sherwan Haji), a stowaway on a coal freighter who arrives in Finland after falling asleep while seeking refuge on the boat in Poland. Upon arrival, he immediately applies for asylum in Helsinki. Meanwhile, across town Wikstrom (Sakari Kuosmanen) is a shirt and tie salesman at the end of his tether who decides to change his career. After a successful game of stud poker, where he wins a large sum of money, Wikstrom buys himself a shabby restaurant in a corner of town and attempts to revive its poor trade, though he decides to keep on the three hapless employees who still work there. Khaled meanwhile has had his application for asylum refused, so he breaks loose as the authorities attempt to deport him back to Aleppo. He takes shelter in the back yard of Wikstrom’s new establishment and the new owner quickly takes him on by giving him a job cleaning, and a better place to stay. Kaurismaki’s film is both heartfelt and exceptionally funny. It’s a film that doesn’t look particularly attractive, but its political, racial and social undertones, along with a profoundly personal account of the crisis in Syria through the eyes of Haji’s Khaled make this engrossing throughout. The character of Khaled not only has the threat of being deported, but must also deal with constant racism, both from the police and citizens on the streets of Helsinki. The film deals with some very serious subject matter and darker themes but make no mistake, THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE is very much a comedy and it is hilarious all the way through. (Finnish/Swedish/English with subtitles)

(15) 108 mins Wednesday 26th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Aki Kaurismäki
Stars: Ville Virtanen, Kati Outinen, Tommi Korpel

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Wenesday 26th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


THE PROMISE  

Every year, on April 24, a solemn procession of men, women, and children commences in Yerevan, the capital of the former Soviet republic of Armenia. A sea of sad Armenian faces makes its way up to the hill of Tsitsernakaberd to the Armenian Genocide Memorial. It is here that every year the victims of one of the 20th century’s greatest crimes are quietly honored. An ancient Christian country located just south of Russia and east of Turkey, Armenia has seen much suffering in its long history. However, of all the tragedies experienced by this small yet resilient nation, none compares to the enormity of the Armenian genocide of 1915. The genocide was committed by the Ottoman Empire during World War I. Possessed by a fanatical nationalism, the ruling Young Turk government accused its Christian Armenian subjects of sympathizing with the hated Russian enemy. What followed was the planned, systematic, and ruthless mass murder of as many as 1.5 million Armenian civilians. To this day, Turkey continues to deny the historical reality of the genocide, despite overwhelming scholarly evidence. Terry George’s film THE PROMISE captures the magnitude of this history in a way that no prior film on the genocide has done before. With its sweeping cinematography, powerful acting, and all-encompassing story, it is a truly epic work that effectively and humanely conveys the story of the tragedy. The film’s story centers on the aspiring doctor Mikael Pogosian (well-portrayed by Oscar Issac) who leaves his native village in southern Turkey to study medicine in Constantinople. Betrothed to a young woman in his village, Mikael falls in love with the beautiful Ana Khesarian (Charlotte Le Bon), a French-Armenian woman, in Constantinople. However, she is also involved with Associated Press reporter Chris Myers (Christian Bale). In the midst of this love story, all three of the characters personally experience the genocide unfolding before them in different ways. Powerful and timely, THE PROMISE finally tells the story of one of the greatest human tragedies of all time.

(12A) 133 mins Friday 28th July 2017 7:30pm
Director: Terry George
Stars: Christian Bale, Oscar Isaac, Shohreh Aghdashloo

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

Friday 28th July
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


LADY MACBETH  

Theatre director William Oldroyd makes excellent use of negative space in his feature debut LADY MACBETH - adapted from Nikolai Leskov's Russian novel Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk by Alice Birch and set in 1865 - with almost every interior frame suggesting absence. It's appropriate for his central character Katherine (Florence Pugh), a young woman who has been sold into an empty marriage to the much older Alexander (Paul Hilton). She moves into his ancestral country pile in the north-east of England, where she also finds herself under close scrutiny from her domineering father-in-law Boris (Christopher Fairbank) and her black maid Anna (Naomi Ackie), who adds to Katherine's confines every day as she wordlessly straps her into her corset. The rooms of the house have a similar strait-laced austerity, the sitting room a masterclass in symmetry, where Katherine perches each day - a barely animated still life - trying not to fall asleep. The stifling atmosphere sits in sharp contrast to the way cinematographer Ari Wegner captures the autumnal richness of the countryside surrounding the house - made all the more attractive to Katherine by Boris' orders that she stay indoors contemplating how to be a good wife and mother. Trouble at the family mine takes the men folk from home. While they are away Katherine strikes up an affair with groomsman Sebastian (Cosmo Jarvis), that quickly grows into an obsession - "I'd rather stop you breathing than have you doubt how I feel," she tells him. Just when you think you know this story, Oldroyd and Birch begin to show you that you don't. It may have an element of the gothic romance of Wuthering Heights or dreamy desires of Catherine Cookson but Katherine's psychological landscape is much murkier and more Shakespearean than you might imagine. We, like Sebastian and Anna, can only look on as Katherine's moral framework begins to disjoint and she becomes “in blood steeped so far that returning would be as tedious as to go o'er.” The tediousness is key, as LADY MACBETH is not just a story of patriarchal dominance and the extreme acts that it can provoke but also a sinister interpretation of how the devil might make work for idle hands.

(15) 87 mins Wednesday 6th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: William Oldroyd
Stars: Florence Pugh, Christopher Fairbank, Cosmo Jarvis

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 6TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


WHISKEY GALORE!  

The story of WHISKEY GALORE! is as charming as it is simple. It recounts the legend of the Scottish Island of Todday, where an isolated community experienced a drought of whisky during the height of the war. As one of its characters snidely remarks, the dilemma is hardly an outbreak of disease, which the village itself agrees with. No, it’s far worse than that. For Todday, whisky is ingrained in its culture and heritage defining much of the community’s identity and Gillies MacKinnon’s remake of the 1949 Ealing Studios classic celebrates this continuously throughout the 98-minute running time. It stands as a serviceable retelling of Scots outwitting some overly taut Brits with some harmless law breaking. The film begins with a disclaimer that the events are based on a true story, an incident still discussed by the residents of the real life island of Eriskay to this day. In 1941, after an extensive period without whisky from rationing during the war, a shipwreck containing 24,000 crates of whisky inspired the locals to raid the ship for its sorely-needed liquor. Before the custom authorities could arrive to investigate, the village buried the whisky in the sandy beach, drainage pipes and anywhere else they could think of in order to preserve the crates for themselves. Not only has the legend passed on through generations, but some locals often remark that a bottle can be found beneath a bed of sand if a person looks hard enough. WHISKEY GALORE! follows a similar outline, but with the added plot of the postmaster Macroon’s (Gregor Fisher) two young daughters Catriona (Ellie Kendrick) and Peggy (Naomi Battrick) and their suitors attempting to marry despite the displeasure of their respective parents. All of this culminates in a film which effectively celebrates a sense of community. With its minuscule budget working for it, the film creates a sense of humility that makes the story and characters charming to watch. No other word describes watching WHISKEY GALORE! more aptly than “delightful.”

(PG) Friday 8th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Gillies MacKinnon
Stars: Ellie Kendrick, James Cosmo, Eddie Izzard

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 8TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00
 


McLAREN  

The name McLAREN is synonymous with motor racing excellence and stands today as a symbol for automotive superiority. Yet what is less known is that the brand was the creation of one young man from New Zealand a pioneer who followed his dream and who against all odds led a team to greatness and himself to become a motorsport champion and hero.  Despite the tragic end to his life, Bruce’s legacy lives on and his vision, passion and drive to innovate continues to be at the heart of advanced motor engineering to this day. McLAREN is a truly inspirational story of a young boy from humble birth who dared to take on the elite world of motor racing and win.

(12A) 89 mins Saturday 9th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Roger Donaldson
Stars: Mario Andretti, Alastair Caldwell, Dwayne Cameron

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

SATURDAY 9TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00
 


MAUDIE  

It is heartening to see a biopic of a painter that pays close attention to the frame, for frames were of paramount important to Maud Lewis, the Canadian folk artist, and the subject of Aisling Walsh’s superbly crafted, marvellously acted, MAUDIE. Living for all her life in a tiny fishing village in Nova Scotia, Maud Dowley (Sally Hawkins) suffers from severe rheumatoid arthritis from an early age, which makes her seemingly unfit for work or marriage. Limping, bent, shuffling Maud has a fierce will, however, and so when she sees an opportunity to work as a housekeeper and cook for Everett Lewis (Ethan Hawke), a gruff local fish peddler, she seizes it. Everett’s tiny shack is a dismal place, and Maud begins painting the walls to brighten it up, much to Everett’s anger. Then again, he is furious at her for almost every little thing and given to violent outbursts. Maud paints Christmas cards and helps Everett with his rounds. When one of his customers offers to buy one of Maud’s paintings, Everett’s resentment is clear, but five bucks is five bucks. Later she’ll become famous – another source of bitterness for a man who doesn’t much care for people tramping outside his house. The two fall into a routine. He sells fish and does odd jobs, she keeps house and paints, and is happiest painting by the window because a window is “the whole world framed.” They share a bed only because the alternative is for her to sleep on the floor. Several weeks after moving in with him, they marry. MAUDIE is a love story with a moving narrative arc covering several decades, with a heart-breaking secret at its centre. There is much to admire in the film’s look and feel, but it is the performances that will stick with the viewer. As Maud, Sally Hawkins gives an outstanding physical performance matched by a quiet resolve and a somewhat mischievous sense of humour. She’s in almost every scene and it’s easy to see why there is already awards buzz for her performance: she doesn’t demand sympathy or take the role as an excuse for some damp-eyed Oscar baiting, yet she’s unforgettable. Ethan Hawke brings intensity of a different sort to the taciturn Everett. The impoverished rural working-class male is a character that the cinema has all but forgotten or doesn’t know how to represent, but Hawke has captured something authentic here. MAUDIE is a quiet triumph for Aisling Walsh, and for Irish cinema. Be sure to see it as it is undoubtedly one of the year’s best Irish films. Bring tissues.

(12A) 116 mins Tuesday 12th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Aisling Walsh
Stars: Sally Hawkins, Ethan Hawke, Kari Matchett

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

TUESDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


MOULIN ROUGE  

Prepare to be transported into Baz Luhrmann's underworld, where the most famous courtesan in Paris, Satine (Nicole Kidman) is "the sparkling diamond of the Moulin Rouge" and a penniless writer, called Christian (Ewan McGregor), falls in love with her. Yes, MOULIN ROUGE (2001) returns to our screen. Any pretence at realism dies long before Satine sings Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend and, in dying, opens your eyes to a visual feast of colour and movement, the songs of Elton John and Madonna and the exuberance and imagination of Hollywood musicals of the Forties. With its credo - "the greatest thing you'll ever learn is to love and be loved in return" - and tragic outcome, it is closer to opera, intensely emotional and yet gay in the wildest, most old-fashioned meaning of the word. The Moulin Rouge is a showplace, a nightclub, a dream palace, where the ruling classes come together with the lower orders in a seductive mix of sensual exhibitionism, presided over by the larger-than-life figure of Harold Zidler (Jim Broadbent). Despite a chorus of fools - Toulouse-Lautrec (John Leguizamo) and what T-Rex called "The Children of The Revolution" - it would be a mistake to dismiss the film as grandiose pantomime. The musical score rides roughshod over historical fact, with scintillating effect. The introductory number has the hip-hop beat of Missy Elliott at its core and, for a brief moment, winking contemptuously at Tinkerbell, Kylie Monogue shakes a tail feather, like a miniaturised Busby Berkeley renegade. The story of The Duke (Richard Roxburgh), whose infatuation with Satine is capitalised on by Zidler in his search for funding, has a dark and dangerous side to it. She knows what she has to do and she knows the price. Failure would throw her back on the street, from whence she came. "I am paid to make people believe what they want to believe," she tells an idealistic Christian, who cannot bear the thought of her with any other man, especially a depraved aristocrat. Luhrmann exploits Kidman's grace and beauty. Hardly the waif, she personifies glamour and yet retains her sense of humour. McGregor plays the innocent in a lunatic asylum, with exactly the right degree of naivety and passion. Being a musical, the language of love is the language of lyrics - "I follow the light, can't stand the night" - choreographed by John O'Connell, with such verve and sensitivity the heart leaps like a salmon. Although unapologetically artificial and outrageously inventive, MOULIN ROUGE resurrects a moment in the history of cabaret when spectacle ravished the senses in an atmosphere of bohemian abandon.

(12A) 127 mins Wednesday 13th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Baz Luhrmann
Stars: Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor, John Leguizamo

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 13TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


HAMPSTEAD  

Inspired by a true story, HAMPSTEAD follows American widow Emily Walters (Diane Keaton). Emily is living on the edge of the Heath, but can’t quite seem to focus on the things that need attention, like her lovely old apartment, her finances and even her son. One day while looking out across the Heath from her attic window, she spies a ramshackle hut, which appears to be inhabited by an unkempt man named Donald (Brendan Gleeson). She witnesses him being attacked by a group of professional thugs. Shocked, she calls the police and watches, through her binoculars, as help arrives. The next day she ventures into the woods in search of the man. Donald has lived quietly and harmoniously on the edge of the Heath for 17 years but now his lifestyle is under threat – his home is the target of property developers who’ve started using heavy-handed tactics to remove him. HAMPSTEAD is a charming and funny life-affirming tale about how love can be found in the most unexpected places and proves once and for all that age is no barrier to second chances.

(12A) 103 mins Thursday 14th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Joel Hopkins
Stars: Diane Keaton, Brendan Gleeson, James Norton

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 14TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


MY COUSIN RACHEL  

If Gothic romance is your thing, you won't find a more absorbing and intriguing tale than this adaptation of Daphne DuMaurier's best-selling novel, MY COUSIN RACHEL. Orphaned at an early age, Philip Ashley is raised by his benevolent older cousin, Ambrose. Resolutely single, Ambrose delights in Philip as his heir, a man who will love his grand home as much as he does himself. But the cosy world the two construct is shattered when Ambrose sets off on a trip to Florence. There he falls in love and marries - and there he dies suddenly. Jealous of his marriage, racked by suspicion at the hints in Ambrose's letters, and grief-stricken by his death, Philip prepares to meet his cousin's widow with hatred in his heart. Despite himself, Philip is drawn to this beautiful, sophisticated, mysterious Rachel like a moth to the flame. And yet... might she have had a hand in Ambrose's death? Not only is the atmosphere completely realized, but the elegant performances make the story even more compelling to watch as it unfolds a tale of possible murder and cunning deceit. Sam Claflin cuts a fine figure as the romantic hero of the piece--brooding, intense and passionate, reminding one of Heathcliff in the Bronte novel, "Wuthering Heights." He's an angry and impressionable youth who intends to accuse his cousin of murder based on his suspicious nature, but instead falls wildly in love with her the instant they meet. Rachel Weisz matches Claflin scene by scene, her charming manners and poise as a woman of the world understandably provoking his interest. At first, he assumes she wants to claim her inheritance when she visits Cornwall. But soon he sees her in a different light and when he falls in love with her, he decides to leave his entire inheritance to her on his 25th birthday. It is then that MY COUSIN RACHEL becomes even more compelling when the ambiguous nature of Rachel comes at long last to the surface.

(12A) 106 mins Friday 15th, Saturday 16th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Roger Michell
Stars: Rachel Weisz, Sam Claflin, Holliday Grainger

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 15TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 16TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 A MAN CALLED OVE  

With Fredrik Backman's whimsical novel A MAN CALLED OVE selling over 650,000 copies in Sweden (i.e. one copy for every 15 people), it was only ever a matter of time until it made its way to the big screen. This adaptation by Hannes Holm maintains the careful balance between pathos and sardonic observation that endeared it to readers. Rolf Lassgård plays the titular Ove, recently bereaved, then sacked from his job of 43 years and told this will mean he has new opportunities in life. He can see only one thing worth pursuing, and that's a spot in the cemetery near his dear wife. So he goes home and sets up a noose in his living room, ready to end it all. But Ove trying to die is like Adam West's Batman trying to get rid of a bomb - there's just always something getting in the way. First it's the new neighbours backing their car into his mailbox - in an area where they're not even supposed to be driving - then it's their cute children pressing their faces up against his window and saying hello. Perhaps life wouldn't be so bad for Ove if it weren't for other people. They infuriate him. They break things, they ignore carefully spelled out rules; they lack even the basics of good manners and essential life skills. Ove doesn't take this lying down. He is a prodigious writer of letters of complaint, a kicker of dogs whose owners walk them in the wrong place. The last thing he needs is new neighbours who want to be his friends - yet gradually, a combination of their niceness and their haplessness draws him in. Lassgård is well suited to the leading role, making Ove's meanness as delightful as his gradual opening up. As neighbour Parvaneh, Bahar Pars brings joie de vivre but shows us enough rough edges to keep things feeling real. The children are delightful but used sparingly, to avoid cloying sentiment; and a handsome Persian cat delivers both charm and a scowl. The result is that A MAN CALLED OVE is a lighthearted, charming film which people of all ages will enjoy. (Swedish/Persian with subtitles).

(15) 116 mins Thursday 21st September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Hannes Holm
Stars: Rolf Lassgård, Bahar Pars, Filip Berg

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 21ST SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


CHURCHILL  

CHURCHILL takes us on a journey back in time to June 1944. Allied Forces stand on the brink: a massive army is secretly assembled on the south coast of Britain, poised to re-take Nazi-occupied Europe. One man stands in their way: Winston Churchill (Brian Cox). Behind the iconic figure and rousing speeches: a man who has faced political ridicule, military failure and a speech impediment: an impulsive, sometimes bullying personality - fearful, obsessive and hurting. Fearful of repeating, on his disastrous command, the mass slaughter of 1915, when hundreds of thousands of young men were cut down on the beaches of Gallipoli, Churchill is obsessed with fulfilling historical greatness: his destiny. Exhausted by years of war and plagued by depression, Churchill is a shadow of the hero who has resisted Hitler's Blitzkrieg. Should the D-Day landings fail, he is terrified he'll be remembered as an architect of carnage. Political opponents sharpen their knives. General Eisenhower and Field Marshal Montgomery are increasingly frustrated by Churchill's attempts to stop the invasion. King George VI must intervene. Only the support of Churchill's brilliant, yet exasperated wife Clementine (Miranda Richardson) can halt the Prime Minister's physical and mental collapse. CHURCHILL tells the untold story of Britain's most celebrated leader, uncovering the true nature of Churchill's herculean war-time status and his vital relationship with "Clemmie" - his backbone and total confidant...the love that inspired him to greatness.

(PG) 98 mins Friday 22nd, Saturday 23rd September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Jonathan Teplitzky
Stars: Brian Cox, Miranda Richardson, John Slattery

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 22ND SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 23RD SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


HOTEL SALVATION  

An Indian comedy full of emotional depth and understated paradox, HOTEL SALVATION describes the tragicomic ordeal of an over-worked modern son who is forced to set his job aside and accompany his elderly father to the holy city of Varanasi to, presumably, die. The film approaches the topic of getting old and dying with down-to-earth humor that never lessens its basic respect for the characters' dignity. On a more ambitious level, the film humorously illustrates the traditional Hindi philosophy of death and freedom from entrapment and attachment, but in such a low-key way it's never a burden. A harried middle-aged accountant, Rajiv (Adil Hussain) is so busy counting money he barely has time for his family, which includes his wife and teenage daughter and the spry Daya (Lalit Behl), a dignified old fellow of 77 who seems a little out of it. His routine is suddenly interrupted when Dad has a prophetic dream about his death, and decides it’s time to pack up and wait for the end in the holy Hindu city on the Ganges. Rajiv has no choice but to accompany him. A man ruled by the clock, he has to wonder how long the journey will take. As his boss snaps, “You can attain salvation anywhere, don’t forget your targets!” This sets up the basic question of the role of tradition in modern India, a theme that subtly plays in the background through the whole film.  If there was ever a timeless city, it’s Varanasi, and as soon as they arrive Rajiv finds himself caught between his responsibility to his father and to his boss, who calls him mercilessly. They check into a cramped, mice-ridden hostel run by the practical, curmudgeonly Mishraji (Anil K. Rastogi) who claims to know when all his residents will die but of course he won’t tell them. In any case, turnover is high and no one is allowed to stay longer than two weeks. Will it be enough? HOTEL SALVATION pleasantly brings out the warmth of the sun on dilapidated walls and peeling paint to produce a tale of human warmth with charming humour. (Hindi with subtitles).

(15) 102 mins Wednesday 27th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Shubhashish Bhutiani
Stars: Adil Hussain, Lalit Behl, Geetanjali Kulkarni

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 27TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


TOMMY’S HONOUR  

Beginning with an aerial shot of the ruins of St. Andrews and some plaintive fiddle music, TOMMY’S HONOUR opens very much in the tradition of the mournful Scottish film. It soon finds its feet, however, and with an excellent cast, a well written script, its easy charm and the universality of its story which, as it happens, is less about golf and more about familial love, this is a real winner. The wonderfully bearded Tom Morris Sr. is played by (who else) Peter Mullan, who brings one of his finer performances to the role, somehow managing to season his gruff curmudgeonly exterior with just the right hint of paternal warmth. His son, Tom Morris Jr., is portrayed superbly by Jack Lowden, a young actor we will undoubtedly be seeing more of. There is a real chemistry between a father and son, who are bonded through their love of, and talent for, golf. Yet the relationship is not without its tensions. Tom Jr. is very often the angry young man which British cinema has frequently excelled in bringing to the screen, eager to move out from his father’s shadow. Morris Sr. is the green keeper at the home of golf, the Old Course at St. Andrews, and as such frequently caddies for the gentleman who are members of the antiquated institution. Added to that, the gentleman place large sums of money as bets on Morris Sr., and subsequently young Tom too, to win on the course. Yet the golfers themselves see little of this money. Generational conflict arises as young Tom’s talent with the sticks brings a certain amount of glory, along with the still as-yet unmatched honour of becoming the youngest winner of The Open, golf’s most prestigious tournament, and the only man to win it four years in a row. As such, young Tom begins to feel the injustice of the riches being made on his behalf by the esteemed, red coated gentlemen who belong to a club he cannot join. Sam Neill plays chief aristocrat Alexander Boothby, who is most offended by the impertinence of young Tom, who demands a fair share of the purse. His father and the golfing gentry are not the only ones with whom young Tom comes into conflict. His mother disapproves of his courtship, and eventual marriage, of Meg, played by Ophelia Lovibond in yet another of the film’s strong performances, whom we learn lost a child previously, one born out of wedlock. It is around these barriers that the film rattles along at a fair pace, peppered with gentle warmth and good humour. At its heart, TOMMY’S HONOUR is an underdog story, one in which a talented young man from humble beginnings must prove his worth despite the confines of the British class system. This, allied with its look at the modern birth of the game of golf, makes for an engaging film on every level.

(PG) 112 mins Thursday 28th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Jason Connery
Stars: Sam Neill, Ophelia Lovibond, Peter Mullan

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 28TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


DUNKIRK  

Epic in scope and with an all-star cast, Christopher Nolan’s DUNKIRK promises to be one of the big films for 2017. In May 1940, Germany advanced into France, trapping Allied troops on the beaches of Dunkirk. Under air and ground cover from British and French forces, troops were slowly and methodically evacuated from the beach using every serviceable naval and civilian vessel that could be found. At the end of this heroic mission, 330,000 French, British, Belgian and Dutch soldiers were safely evacuated. The cast includes Tom Hardy, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, James D'Arcy, Mark Rylance, Harry Styles, Jack Lowden, Aneurin Barnard. While we all know the basic historical facts about this event, DUNKIRK will remind us all that this was Britain’s finest hour because of the heroism of those involved.

(15) Friday 29th, Saturday 30th September 2017 7:30pm
Director: Christopher Nolan
Stars: Tom Hardy, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 30TH SEPTEMBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 THE TREE OF WOODEN CLOGS  

Ermanno Olmi won the Palme D’Or at Cannes in 1978 with THE TREE OF WOODEN CLOGS, a three-hour marathon of peasant life in Lombardy at the turn of the 19th/20th centuries, using non-actors from the Bergamo district. It is, of its kind, a masterwork. The hardship of the peasant’s lives may compare unfavourably with that of the landlord, who owns everything – their homes, fields, crops and the majority of livestock – yet the sense of community and shared experience is a powerful unifying force. The life of these peasants, illiterate, God fearing and hidebound by tradition, is subservient, harsh and beholden to their feudal master. The women and young girls have babies in their arms and pails of water in their hands. They dress in black or dark colours and are cleaning, knitting, mending, cooking, washing and gossiping. One of the little boys walks five miles to school and five miles back every day. He’s the only one. His dad carves him a new pair of clogs from one of the landlord’s trees, because his old ones are worn down, and it causes terrible trouble. The film follows the travails and small victories, such as grandpa’s early tomatoes and a marriage, with compassion rather than sentimentality. The beheading of a goose and disemboweling of a live pig emphasise the reality of the farmyard. There is no cruelty intended, simply necessity. When a cow, belonging to one of the families, falls sick, they call out the vet. When a baby is due, they decide they cannot afford a midwife. In the evenings, the families gather in the stable for storytelling, singing and conversation. The young girls’ suitors are welcomed in their Sunday best, but only as observers, and so stand at the back trying to catch the eye of their wished-for beloved. As a record of life before emancipation, when farm labourers had fewer rights than the beasts of the fields, this is a tribute to their spirit and an uplifting testament to human endeavour. Few movies have been done with greater sensitivity or integrity than THE TREE OF WOODEN CLOGS. Surely no three-hour movie has ever seemed so short. (Italian with subtitles).

(12) 178 mins Wednesday 4th October 2017 7:00pm
Director: Ermanno Olmi
Stars: Luigi Ornaghi, Francesca Moriggi, Omar Brignoli

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 4TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


ALONE IN BERLIN  

Emma Thompson and Brendan Gleeson star as unexpected Nazi resistors Anna and Otto Quangel in Vincent Perez's ALONE IN BERLIN. The film tells the story of Anna and Otto's quiet act of rebellion at a time when any sign of disloyalty to the Nazis was punished without mercy. Upon hearing that their son has been killed in action, Anna and Otto, their marriage apparently one of coexistence rather than affection, grieve separately. Although not Party members themselves, both are scrutinised for any hint of non-conformism. Their Jewish neighbour, Mrs Rosenthal, is hidden by the generous Judge Fromm, while looters inform on her whereabouts. One day Otto decides to speak out against Hitler. He writes on postcards such provocations as, 'Hitler murdered my son, he will murder yours too', disguising his handwriting and using gloves to avoid fingerprints. Otto and Anna then set out to distribute the cards around the city, leaving them discretely in office and residential buildings. Almost immediately the Gestapo are alerted to the activity, as most of the postcards are handed in to the authorities - no one wants to be caught with such statements in their possession. Inspector Escherich, played with conviction by Daniel Brühl, sets out to find the person responsible; someone he suspects will be uneducated, but not unskilled and recently bereaved. Thompson and Gleeson give committed and restrained performances, relying on gesture rather than verbal cues to indicate the tension in their marriage. As their dangerous rebellion becomes a fixture in their life, Anna and Otto bond once more, and this gradual shift is played with sensitivity by the film's leads. ALONE IN BERLIN is an interesting and welcome portrayal of a story that is told for the German point of view. Here, we witness normal-German people feeling the effects of the Nazi regime. We feel their pain on an individual basis through the eyes of everyday working-class characters. It’s a refreshing change.

(12A) 103 mins Friday 6th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: Vincent Perez
Stars: Emma Thompson, Daniel Brühl, Brendan Gleeson

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 6TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


HOWARD’S END  

HOWARD’S END (1992) is a magnificent movie and one of the greatest adaptations from novel to film. It’s a story that intertwines the lower, middle, and upper classes in an intriguing tale of love, pity, and pride. Margaret Schlegel (Emma Thompson) inadvertently gets involved in the affairs of the upper class Wilcox’s after befriending the eldest of them, Ruth (Vanessa Redgrave), while her sister Helen (Helena Bonham Carter) gets involved in the affairs of a lower class man named Leonard Bast (Samuel West). It’s a realistic portrait of how people acted in the ‘late 19th/early 20th century’. Forget Downton Abbey, HOWARD’S END is a much more interesting story. The acting is perfect. Emma Thompson never misses a beat. Every line that is spoken is calculated, heartfelt, and believable. She deserved her Academy Award for Best Actress. Helena Bonham-Carter actually upstaged Thompson in this film, for she played the more passionate and fiery character. Anthony Hopkins and Vanessa Redgrave also gave perfect performances as the upper-classed Wilcox’s, while Samuel Best gave a very sympathetic and likable performance as the lower class Leonard. Overall, HOWARD’S END is a brilliant story that is cast perfectly with well calculated performances. It contains brilliant costumes and cinematography, along with wonderful music to accompany it. You get transported into a time where the difference between classes are gigantic, and the women (no matter how intelligent or feminist they were) still felt the need to get married. It’s a beautiful film.

(PG) 136 mins Thursday 12th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: James Ivory
Stars: Anthony Hopkins, Emma Thompson, Vanessa Redgrave

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 12TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 THE BEGUILED  

THE BEGUILED is an atmospheric thriller from acclaimed writer/director Sofia Coppola. During the Civil War, Union Corporal John McBurney (Colin Farrell) is wounded and is discovered in the woods by a young girl from a school for women in Louisiana. With a broken leg, he is nursed back to health with the help of the school owner Martha Farnsworth (Nicole Kidman) and the rest of the women who tend to him, fascinated by the proximity of a full-grown man. McBurney is aware he is behind enemy lines and manages to charm the women into allowing him to stay, even going so far as to pretend he is a visiting southern officer. One of the teachers at the school, Edwina (Kirsten Dunst), through her tending to McBurney, falls in love with the man and the soldier manipulates the woman's emotions convincing her that he loves her. McBurney also seduces Martha understanding that she misses her brother who helped her run the school and who also held an unusual place as romantic partner. One of the older students Alicia (Elle Fanning) approaches McBurney and openly shows her affections for him. Seeking new sensual experiences, she convinces him to make love to her. When McBurney is discovered by the other women in Alicia's room they make a concerted effort to ensure that the wounded soldier will not be allowed to return to Union Troops now occupying the southern territories of Louisiana. The house is taken over with sexual tension and dangerous rivalries, and taboos are broken in an unexpected turn of events. McBurney goes from being an angel to a devil, representing danger, and now the women need to get rid of him. THE BEGUILED becomes almost a psychological horror film, first for McBurney and then for the women.

(15) 94 mins Friday 13th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: Sofia Coppola
Stars: Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 13TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 LAND OF MINE  

In 1945, after five years of Nazi occupation, Denmark faced the pressing issue of how to find and remove munitions and explosives that had been rigged - hidden beneath the landscape by the now defeated German forces. Someone, somewhere in the upper echelons of the Third Reich had evidently thought that the country's western coast was a likely site for an Allied invasion and 2.2 million landmines were planted throughout the Danish beaches and sand dunes. The morally dubious solution of the Allied forces was to use German prisoners of war to locate and defuse the explosive devices LAND OF MINE follows one such group of prisoners and their Danish military overseer, Sargent Carl Leopold Rasmussen (Roland Møller). A military man to his core, Rasmussen's hostility towards the departing occupiers is made clear in the opening sequence where he beats to the ground a German soldier who has the temerity to be clutching a Danish flag as he is being marched out of the country. Rasmussen's antipathy and bitterness only increase when he meets the prisoners assigned to clear a stretch of beach with 45,000 mines - they are barely men at all but boys still in their teens (in the case of a pair of twins - played by Emil and Oskar Belton - they are arguably still children) with little experience of war or bomb disposal. This is both a reflection of historical fact in the dying days of the war, the Nazis were reduced to conscripting younger members of the German population who therefore had minimal military training - but also a clever way for writer/director Martin Zandvliet to neutrally present perspectives from both sides. It is noticeable that there is no discussion of wartime activities or experiences and no mention of Hitler or the Nazis between the boys - instead the focus is on what they will do when they are allowed to go home (they have been told that once they have cleared this beach they will be returned to Germany). This focus on the future - alongside their youth and 'political neutrality', for want of a better phrase allows the audience to become invested in the characters as individuals (we learn of their hopes and plans) but also creates common ground between the boys and Rasmussen (who knows what it is to miss home). But if Rasmussen's attitude towards his team gradually changes, this is by no means a gentle depiction of the aftermath of the war if anything, it stands as a sharp indictment of the Allies' treatment of German prisoners. The film switches between sequences of high tension and out of the blue shock tactics as the young men are brutally picked off one by one, putting the audience through the wringer and wreaking emotional devastation amongst the group. LAND OF MINE is a well-made production which boasts solid performances from the ensemble with Møller as the standout, as befits his role - and the film's originality lies in the uncovering of a little-known story from a cinematically familiar period of history. (Danish/German/English with subtitles).

(15) 100 mins Wednesday 18th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: Martin Zandvliet
Stars: Roland Møller, Louis Hofmann, Joel Basman

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 18TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 ATOMIC BLONDE  

Despite director David Leitch’s ties to Keanu Reeves John Wick, ATOMIC BLONDE is no Lady John Wick. Cold War locales may radiate similar neon hues, but this espionage thrill-kicker is more about consequence then henchman disposal. Revenge is merely an underlying motivation as government agents fight to keep a power struggle concrete while the Berlin wall crumbles down. Berlin, 1989 a German city loaded with secret government operatives East/West tensions reaching their breaking point. Britain, France and America everyone has agents in Germany, but a rumored list could out every name if it were to be exposed. This is why MI6 Agent Lorraine Broughton (Charlize Theron) is sent to Germany, with a mission of retrieval. Her only contact is David Percival (James McAvoy), but the existence of a double-agent codenamed “Satchel” means there’s no one to trust. Can Broughton flush the list, expose a traitor and stay alive while on enemy turf? Or will the mean streets of Germany introduce a game where no national agency wins. Theron plays an international mistress of mystery, ready to dispatch whatever number of adversaries circle around her. Five police officers bash in an apartment door, only to be defeated by a rubber hose. Broken bottles or household appliances make for helpful weaponry, most times instead of gunplay or trajectory kills. “Realistic” action shows a human side to the undercover seductress, in that she bleeds and depletes energy just like the rest of us but nevertheless, she persists. Pain heals, chicks dig scars and glory lasts forever. ATOMIC BLONDE strikes a deafening blow thanks to enjoyable characters, furious fight-play and Charlize Theron’s brand of screen command. She’s always in control, whether toying with feminine wilds or slugging another glass of Stoli on the rocks. It’s never the female arc where messy emotions complicate everything, weakening an otherwise prototype agent. Lorraine Broughton makes her mark by saying “anything you can do, I can do better,” because she can.

(15) 115 mins Thursday 19th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: David Leitch
Stars: Sofia Boutella, Charlize Theron, James McAvoy

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 19TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 DETROIT  

From Kathryn Bigelow, the Academy Award winning director of The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty, DETROIT tells the gripping story of one of the darkest moments during the civil unrest that rocked Detroit in the summer of '67. A police raid in Detroit in 1967 resulted in one of the largest citizen uprisings in United States history. The story is centred around The Algiers Motel Incident, which occurred in Detroit, Michigan on July 25, 1967, during the racially charged 12th Street Riot. A handful of rioters took over the city of Detroit following a police raid on an unlicensed bar. Army paratroopers, National Guardsmen and state and local police were called on to help put a stop to the rioting, which lasted for five days. What sparked the riots was the racism and discrimination by the police force that was felt within the city by the African American population. In the end, 43 people were dead, almost 1,200 were injured and over 2,000 buildings were destroyed. It involved the death of three black men and the brutal beatings of nine other people: seven black men and two white women. Recreating these events through the eyes of both rioters and police, DETROIT is a gripping and timely tale of a society in crisis.

(TBA) Friday 20th, Saturday 21st October 2017 7:30pm
Director: Kathryn Bigelow
Stars: John Boyega, Anthony Mackie, Algee Smith

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 20TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 21ST OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 A GHOST STORY  

In director David Lowery’s A GHOST STORY, C (Casey Affleck) and M (Rooney Mara) are lovers and struggling young musicians. They just bought their first house out in the country and it’s perfect. Sure, it has creaky floorboards and the piano is always falling out of tune, but it’s their creaky floorboards and funky piano, which makes them perfect. The house is so perfect, in fact, that C refuses to abandon it, even after he dies in a car accident. Donned only in a white sheet with two impossibly black eyeholes the forever-silent C shambles around the house as M struggles to move beyond her formerly perfect life. There are innumerable moments of quiet power in A GHOST STORY. This is definitely not a film to watch on an empty stomach because the silence will betray you. We watch as a decimated M sits on the kitchen floor and devours an entire pie. The minutes silently accumulate; the only sound coming from the fork scraping the pie plate. It seems gratuitous, perhaps even pointless, until you understand the void she’s trying to fill. It’s the same void that prevents her from washing the bed sheets or emptying the trash can. How can she risk erasing the last traces of C’s essence? Eventually M moves out, leaving C behind to stew in his loneliness. Occasionally he lashes out at the house’s new tenants, tossing a plate across the room or striking a discordant note on the piano that M couldn’t bear to take with her. He strolls through vast fields of lush green or stares across endless cityscapes choked with neon and smog. Sometimes he meets one of his own kind and they exchange lamentations. “Who are you waiting for?” “I don’t remember.”
A GHOST STORY isn’t simply an artistic exercise to be enjoyed by daring cinephiles. It’s a beautiful and, quite literally, haunting portrait of our frail humanity. It might seem depressing were it not such a strident affirmation of our existence in this universe, no matter how fleeting. David Lowery has crafted a powerful film that will only improve with time.

(15) 87 mins Wednesday 25th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: David Lowery
Stars: Sonia Acevedo, Casey Affleck, Carlos Bermudez

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

WEDNESDAY 25TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


In its early scenes, Francis Lee’s richly textured first feature, GOD’S OWN COUNTRY, is a bracing, mordant study of northern dourness and deep-seated repression. Josh O’Connor delivers a star-making turn as Johnny Saxby, a young man who’s been struggling to run his family’s remote Yorkshire farm since his taciturn father Martin (Ian Hart) was incapacitated by a stroke. Johnny has come to terms with his sexuality to the extent that he’ll indulge in the odd spot of discreet cottaging, but we see him virtually recoil in horror when one of his hookups innocuously suggests going for a pint. Presumably in a bid to keep a lid on his self-loathing, he spends his evenings drinking himself into oblivion, invariably rendering himself unfit for work the following morning, to the exasperation of his grandmother Deidre (Gemma Jones). Leaving little to the imagination when it comes to the graphic realities of livestock farming, Lee wryly demonstrates that Johnny’s is decidedly not the kind of job that should be tackled whilst nursing a stinking hangover. Family downtime is a comically miserable affair, with all three participants perpetually seething with unspoken resentment and frustration. Into this gloomy picture steps Gheorghe (Alec Secareanu), a Romanian migrant worker hired to provide Johnny with much-needed assistance during lambing season. While he’s sufficiently stoic and sober to win the tacit approval of Martin and Deidre, he also possesses a warmth and optimism that Johnny finds impossible to resist. Yet as their secret relationship blossoms, and as Johnny’s unappealing prickliness begins to dissipate, it’s hard to shake the feeling that this is all going to end horribly. This is largely down to the ominously bleak backdrop against which the affair unfolds – Lee and cinematographer Joshua James Richards evoke an untamed world of pummelling rain and eerie, mist-strewn wilderness. But things aren’t quite as grim up north as they may seem. In a deft act of willful misdirection, Lee orchestrates a sequence in which Deidre seemingly reacts to the revelation of the boys’ relationship with the anguished waterworks one might condescendingly expect from a countryside-dwelling pensioner. But moments later it becomes apparent that she’s upset about something else entirely – her actual response to her grandson’s dark secret is one of nonchalant acceptance. As it transpires that Johnny faces fewer obstacles to happiness than he evidently feared, Lee calmly builds to an emotional payoff that’s all-the-more satisfying for its simplicity and restraint. GOD’S OWN COUNTRY is surely one of the most assured, fully-formed British debuts of recent years.

(TBA) 104 mins Thursday 26th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: Francis Lee
Stars: Josh O'Connor, Alec Secareanu, Gemma Jones

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

THURSDAY 26TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00


 THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM  

Nobody feels London's past coming up behind him quite like Peter Ackroyd. Among his many novels enjoying that sensation is his 1994 murder mystery, THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM which brings together so many of his interests: music hall, travesty, occultism, the East End as it used to be, literary teasing and bloody slaughter. Now naughty minded Jane Goldman has adapted it for this exceptionally saucy, violent and entertaining film. In high Victorian London, a newly promoted, secretly gay police inspector, John Kildare (Bill Nighy) is charged with investigating a gruesome series of escalating Ripper-type killings in the East End, attributed to a terrifying "golem", a monster from Judaic mythology. Expected by his superiors to fail, Kildare, dressed in a series of incredibly tightly buttoned three-piece suits, assisted by a gamey constable, does his best, swiftly decoding a Latin inscription left at the scene of the latest mass killing as "he who observes spills no less blood than he who inflicts the blow". This ominous saying he traces to Thomas de Quincey's essay, On Murder Considered as one of the Fine Arts and when he goes to the British Library to consult the book, he finds it has been inscribed in a distinctive hand with the Golem's own diary. So his search turns into a graphological quest. The library keeps a record of its readers and the only possible candidates seem to be Karl Marx, George Gissing, the cross-dressing music hall star Dan Leno, and an unsuccessful playwright and journalist called John Cree. As Kildare tracks down each of these leads, we get to see each one of these candidates as the murderer - including Karl Marx vindictively sawing up a victim, a joy in itself. But there is a complication: John Cree is dead, apparently poisoned by his wife, Elizabeth. And she, aka Little Lizzie, is herself a star of the music hall, a protege of the very same Dan Leno (fancifully played by Douglas Booth) and the place's dodgy manager, "Uncle" (the ever-creepy Eddie Marsan). As Lizzie, betrayed by her rivalrous maid, stands to hang for the murder, Kildare works furiously to prove either that John Cree took his own life, unable to carry on with his murderous career, or that if Lizzie did do for him, she has the justification that she knew what he was, which should save her from the rope. THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM is a fast-moving horror cum panto, nicely staged, all fog and darkness, with the melodrama and off colour humour of the music-hall itself. And it has a star turn: 22 year old Olivia Cooke, originally from Manchester, so magnetic and charming as Elizabeth Cree, a girl who has hauled herself out of desperate poverty on to the stage she loves. She's enchanting. You'd only want to protect her, wouldn't you? But this is London. "We're all part of London's tapestry sometimes threads get crossed." Oh, they do, they do. Just ask Peter.

(15) 109 mins Friday 27th, Saturday 28th October 2017 7:30pm
Director: Juan Carlos Medina
Stars: Bill Nighy, Olivia Cooke, Eddie Marsan

(Please note we allocate seats for this performance. You will receive your seating confirmation in a separate email.)

FRIDAY 27TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

SATURDAY 28TH OCTOBER
Adult £6.00
Concession (Under 16, Students, Unwaged, Over 60) £5.00

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